simon_dell

Does my kitchen HAVE to have a rangehood?

Simon Dell
5 years ago
We have a hob that's in an open benchtop and next to a window. It's an induction hob and we don't deep fry or fry much at all. Do we have to have a rangehood?

Comments (24)

  • mcxu8
    5 years ago
    I would definitely put in rangehood. It helps to dispel the smell from cooking, window helps but it doesn't work as well as a rangehood. You wouldn't want to be limited by the type of food you'll be able to cook in future. In future if you decide to sell, it would be more appealing. That's my opinion, hope that helps with your decision.
  • 819esther
    5 years ago
    I very rarely use the range hood. It's only used if something is particularly smokey. We have a medium size window adjacent. Depends on what type of cooking you do, I grill in the oven, stirfry quickly or cook in covered pots so probably don't generate a lot of grease but the overhead cupboards do still get greasy. My previous house didn't have a range hood at all. There were windows in the walls to the left and right of the stove and we had three metre ceilings and no overhead cupboards. Personal choice I think but 99 out of 100 houses will have one.
  • Related Discussions

    I love my new kitchen!! The photos have finally uploaded!

    Q

    Comments (16)
    Hi Tia, they are bamboo. They are actually textured as they are real bamboo, not a laminate copy of bamboo. Although it is still on a layer of wood underneath! If that makes sense? I love the texture! The white cupboards are two pack, I think! :)
    ...See More

    Urgent, does my rug need to be bigger, have to decide by tomorrow

    Q

    Comments (5)
    Yes you do, I say go one size up... even if you pull it under the chaise, it will probably end at about the edge of the couch... ideally you'd want it to go past the end of the 2-seater, particularly if you eventually decide to have a coffee table as well
    ...See More

    Will having 2 different benchtop colours work in my kitchen?

    Q

    Comments (16)
    Hello dear, I believe it is to choose and arrange colors to match existing furnishings, or possibly in some cases to even choose furnishings as well to give a certain 'look' to a room or rooms. But, an interior designer is someone who plans, researchers, coordinates, and manages such projects. An interior designer evaluates and designs interior living and work spaces to make them functional, appealing and well-suited to an owner's needs. Interior designers make interior spaces functional, safe, and beautiful by determining space requirements and selecting decorative items, such as colors, lighting, and materials. Recently I have done interior design in my office from HTS Interior Design LLC, who offers an interior solution to meet specific needs from concept design to turnkey Fit Out solution.
    ...See More

    I have no idea how to style this bench in my kitchen

    Q

    Comments (21)
    Ooh lovely Bluesea sea, I think you could arrange them all together similar to these pic’s , add a few extra kitchen things like grinders etc, lovely love the glass dome
    ...See More
  • rocketjcat
    5 years ago
    We don't have one over our stove in an open island. I didn't want the obstruction. Aside from setting off the smoke detector once every couple of years, I have never missed it. I never deep fry, but do sauté on the stove with no big smell problem.
  • Bryden McMillan
    5 years ago
    Check your local building laws.

    I know in Australia where is live the kitchen must have an external vented and powered fan. Which is mostly done with a range good.
  • dooenmabest
    5 years ago
    Our kitchen has a rangehood which is never used. I found it difficult to clean and it always seemed to smell like a fish and chip shop. Now it's clean and smells fresh and is never used. The house is always open for good air flow.

    In my next kitchen, currently being built, I won't have one. I'll have some extra storage space instead. I asked the builder if it was a requirement and he said it isn't.
  • ladyrob1
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago
    My kitchen is so old that the stove - a cast iron wood burning stove was set in a recess on a podium of bricks and bricked all around. The 'roof' of the recess was closed in with galvanised iron sheeting and through it went the flue up from the stove,into the roof cavity and out through the house roof...like a little chimney. Its still there but has no function for now,
    On either side of the recess there were and still are louvre windows.
    When came the day to fix it up a bit the idea of "Range Hood" had already been catered to. Simply open part of the gal iron roof in the recess and set in a stainless steel funnel with a flue higher up into the house roof cavity connected to the old gal iron outer flue...and viola'. Its not such a new invention after all and when I remodel the kitchen the new stove will be right there in the old, but refurbished recess. I am a lucky ducky aren't I? Even better, all the odours and steam and smoke will not be enclosed in the roof cavity but will be carried off by the wind.
  • myperfectadvice
    5 years ago
    Yes.....they are effective and look good!
  • ladyrob1
    5 years ago
    @ mydesign0401 we have no reticulated gas here - unfortunately, so my new stove will be an electric side by side cooktops and oven. Ithought to have a rather large, decorative 'country' looking range hood since there is provision for one > Am in Queensland so do not know the requirements, but whatever they are, if any, there will be plenty of height. The hood will need to be either decorative or otherwise concealed in the cavity already there that housed the wood stove flue...the cavity is quite wide so there are a number of design possibilities that excite me. If something just must be there I like it to look decorative....as if it were my idea...so I don't appear to be a conformist...and again, do not want to spoil the "old house" feel.
  • ladyrob1
    5 years ago
    @ myoerfectadvice...do you really think that range hoods look good? I don't, but if I am looking at somebody's kitchen, funny thing, its the first item I look for!
  • mldesign0401
    5 years ago
    @ladyrob1 if your range is within a fire rated hearth and is contained with a working chimney, your range hood is not a mandatory thing. If you have a fire rated enclosure, and an exhaust I.e chimney then your requirements are met.
    In modern kitchens, the materials used are not fire rated generally, and joinery along with splash backs and some appliances will sustain a flame, so anything omitting a flame, or even acting as a heat source needs to meet regulation on clear distance and venting for that reason. The country ranges themselves are fully exhausted with a flue, and contain their heat source. I like to conceal my range hoods, and don't generally put them on show. I prefer fully integrated unless they make a design statement with a canopy hood surround, and create that country canopy.
  • ladyrob1
    5 years ago
    @ mydesign0401 THANKS! Unfortunately the brick hearth was demolished when the burnt out cast iron wood stove was removed....along with its family of mice living underneath in the hearth cavity! If the range hood is not mandatory I still have a large empty space above the recess that leads to above the roof and the original gal chimney is still in place....I like it!
    Seems I am fortunate...I can have either a decorative country-looking range hood (beaten copper canopy with some pictorial elements in ceramic...which would be just for swank) or it can be hidden in the existing fire rated cavity...or nothing at all because i have those lovely old arctic glass louvers on either side. the whole of the stove recess down to the floor is lined in gal iron...its a pretty well designed old place...I was amazed when I began pulliung out defunct items.
    One thing...it had an outside Dunny until the 1960's, now there's a pedestal inside the back door where there was a "mud room"...which is now my laundry...that was a tin shed outside with a cast iron copper. Honestly those early women had a hard life!
  • myperfectadvice
    5 years ago
    Well....They make the kitchen look finished and make it look more of a kitchen...
    Don't you think..?
    Mine is hidden in a cupboard and on the bottom of the cupboard is just a silver thing with touch buttons for lights, speed of fan....etc.... You can't really see mine...
  • PRO
    OnePlan
    5 years ago
    Here in UK I've started seeing a lot more ceiling vents over hobs - they are less noticeable and still vent out the vapours - the only downside I can think off is the acrobatic's to get up to clean them !!
  • Luke Buckle
    5 years ago
    Have you all seen that crystal rangehood posted by a Houzzer recently? Hopefully this is the start of something different as I feel the trend for triangular stainless steel funnels that dominate kitchens has gone on long enough.
  • ladyrob1
    5 years ago
    Hi Luke, That sounds very interesting! I agree that the stainlee steel funnels...or the" fish n' chip shop chimneys" I called them when they first apprared as the thing Councils would appove are rather dated...and if one really considers them, are rather overdone for ehat they are....so wiull go looking fot the crystal rangehood on Houzz.
    What do you think of OnePlan's comment of the UK ceiling vents...the decription give, although meagre seems it might be something I could install here since the ceiling and roof cavities with external outlet are already incorporated in the buiuld of my old house....and I live in QLD and we don't seem to have regulations for rangehoods.
  • ladyrob1
    5 years ago
    @ myperfect advice....I am intrigued by your description of your "invisible rangehood" in a cupboard...with controls...sounds very James Bondy. I am at a stage that my make do kitchen could make do for many more years but I am an old lady now and need to bring things into the 21st century...at least a bit, or the new owners will not know what its all on about! Any PICS?
  • mldesign0401
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago
    @ ladyrob1. That James bond range hood is called an undermount. They have been around for many years, and chosen by people adverse to making a feature of the fish n chip funnel!
    They hide neatly into overhaead cabinets, and do not interrupt the joinery what so ever.
    They are also very efficient, and quassair make ones which has the lowest noise output I've seen. They house the extraxtion unitin your roofspace, so you don't even hear that hum. Undermounts offer the next best option to not having one at all.
  • Bryden McMillan
    5 years ago
    My rangehood. Above is a cabinet.
  • PRO
    Karen Goodrich Interiors
    4 years ago

    I say YES! You should have a range hood. For both steam and smells but re-sale too! We recently bought a house without one and everyone walks in and says "where is the fan?" It will complete the kitchen both for look and functionality.

  • PRO
    Signature Custom Homes
    4 years ago

    A range hood is a good idea for both practicality and re-sale. You can now find models which are almost flush with the ceiling and have a remote control if you are worried about the look. Cleaning would be the only downside but if you don't use it often you wouldn't need to clean as often!

  • cloudpants
    4 years ago
    Here's our undermount one, which, as you can see funnels into a cupboard. Second photo shows the hood pulled out and in action. It's very subtle.
  • Lisa Imbruglia
    3 years ago

    I have a pull out rangehood like the one above. It is so loud that I never use it. It only recirculates inside the unit and not to outside. You put charcoal filters inside. I certainly prefer the undermounts as they are less intrusive however most are quite noisy and you really need to shop around for ones with good cubic mtr per hour extraction.

    You can buy silent range hoods! They are from schweigen. German made they are fantastic for use in open plan homes with a minimum of 900 cubic mtr per hour extraction. The motor sits outside the house and can be wall mounted as well as roof. Although not the cheapest in the market they definitely add a special feature to your kitchen and work amazingly. Quality of life. I would change to one of these if I had the opportunity and space allowed!

  • Ken Buxton
    last year

    Hello,

    Sorry in advance to bring up an old thread/subject,

    However looking for any additional advice/direction i can get on comment from midesign0401 below...


    mldesign0401

    In Victoria a range hood is a requirement in new kitchens.
    No longer is it acceptable for a simple exhaust unit, rather it must now be ducted to external air. So your range hood must be flued either through your roof space or via a horizontal duct to an external wall. It must be installed and signed off, and your house insurance will require your sign off document if your house insurance is to cover damage due to fire, or you will find yourself in a predicament.
    The provision for installing a range hood above a gas cooktop is a minimum placement of 650mm above your cooktop, and 605 for an electric hob. Including induction.
    Hope this helps.



    Our new home got handed over to us by builder just before Christmas (21/12/2018),

    We are still waiting for under mount rangehood to be installed into our kitchen,

    The house was delivered with no rangehood as the hole they provided was to close to accommodate rangehood selection,

    After a couple of visits we have been told that cupboards are to be removed and replaced,

    Which we are still waiting for as the 'cabinetmaker is very busy',


    My inquiry is to see whether there is a building code reference/link I can forward on to them to hurry the process up,

    Also concerned that insurance would not cover our new house if there happened to be a fire


    Thanks in advance,

    We look forward o nay help,


    Regards,

    Ken and Nadia Buxton