Which carpet should I choose?

Kezzle176
December 18, 2017
last modified: September 27, 2018

Hi all, we are choosing a carpet for our games room, 3 bedrooms and a passage and the range "Signature floors Cashmere Touch" carpet has blown our minds. It's incredibly soft, and has such a plush feel. I have attached a picture of the specs. Can anyone give me some advice regarding it? obviously all the warranties are there and it's apparently a 7 star rating, stain proof etc but i guess our main concern is how long would the plushness remain- would it be like one of those rugs that after 6 weeks goes all matted? Hoping someone has some experience in this type of carpeting. Any further info you need to help please just let me know. Thank you!






Comments (21)

  • siriuskey

    Hi there, Not my favourite carpet as it tends to show all movement on it but if you love then go for it cheers

  • gwyn5

    If you sew or do craft, chose tufted carpet - no loops.

  • PRO
    Cipriano Italian Home Design

    They are super lovely to walk on in all seasons. Only down fall is they seem to attract ever piece of fluff possible - hope you have a good vacuum

  • PRO
    Illuminide Interiors, Expect Excellence.

    Hey Kezzle 176,

    There are different types of carpet, and the cut and material used is suited for different rooms. I would never put cut pile, (like the sample you like) in a passage area or high traffic area as it will wear over time and tire within a few years. So you need to look at a loop pile, like this...

    The cut pile will wear also in the bedrooms...and if people are coming out of showers etc and going to rooms with wet feet this will wear the carpet down even more and will ultimately fade in parts over time. I usually like a textured loop pile in the bedroom with a pattern creating an extra dimension, hides wear and tear and will last longer.

    Always where possibly look at a wool blended carpet, feels better underfoot and will last longer rather than a synthetic material like rayon or nylons.

    Always consider the long term life of a product, it looks lush and beautiful in the showroom but sometimes spending the extra money for something luxurious in an inappropriate space will ultimately be money down the drain.

    Thanks Paul

  • PRO
    Illuminide Interiors, Expect Excellence.

    On a side point I have a client who installed the carpet you like, virtually the same colour and cut as yours in their bedrooms in 2012, 5 years on it now looks tired and faded in parts with the pile permanently flattened in areas, especially near their ensuites.

  • me me
    Hi illuminide, I am trying to choose a carpet for my hallways, bedrooms and lounge room. I like your advice about wool blend carpets. Do you think that a wool blend berber would have a long life?
  • PRO
    Illuminide Interiors, Expect Excellence.

    Hi me me

    I personally haven't used or seen berber used in a new build or renovation for years. I do recall during the 80's 90's it was in almost every home and in high traffic areas you tended to get that wear mark especially in hallways especially near bathrooms aswell. The other issue is the loop in the carpet tended to come loose because of its size, especially if you have pets with long nails and as kids there was that tendency to have pens and other items being lodged and caught in the loop. Aesthetically it has a heavy for look for mine so depending on the style and what you trying to achieve with your space I wouldn't usually recommend it. Possibly if you were looking at a Hamptons, French Provincial or Classic look to your space then it would be a good option. The machine technology for carpets is so much more advanced now that modern loop piles would be my direction and would be a more inexpensive option and install. The loop and patterns created are so small that they will last a lot longer.

    Hope this helps me me.

    Thanks Paul

  • PRO
    Illuminide Interiors, Expect Excellence.

    The key is the smaller the cut, the smaller the loop, the smaller the fibre the longer they will last. Look at why Persian Rugs get better with age and stand the test of time, the pile is usually super small and each individual fibre is very small.

  • me me
    What would you recommend? I live alone and will soon retire, am looking for something that will last a long time.
  • PRO
    Illuminide Interiors, Expect Excellence.

    The loop pile wool blend would be my choice for long term. It's very hard to make a final selection for you without being on site, having a chat or seeing photos. I would definitely lean toward wool for long life, as well as a loop pile. There are also loop/cut combinations that could be suitable and provide additional pattern.

  • Kezzle176
    Thanks for the info Illuminide, unfortunately a little too late as we have gone ahead with them. just curious does the carpet warranty have no bearing then? The carpet we are getting has a 20 year wear warranty in that it will not wear more than 10% of the originally lay quality. According to the brochures etc this carpet is also one of the most hardwearing carpets and is rated extremely well for high traffic areas as well as stairs. Surely with such bold claims there has to be some sort of truth to what they are selling?
  • PRO
    Two's Company Renovations

    Hello kezzle

    The keys to the performance of cut pile carpets is not the size of the fibre but rather a combination of the amount of yarn per square inch able to take the wear and tear, the type of construction and the type of fibre used.

    Of the types of fibre, Nylon as you have chosen has the best durability and resistance to wear, although as an 'open' fibre it is very susceptible to stains. This is why stain protections were developed and this 'filled' the fibre and gave it great all round performance.

    Polyester on the other hand, is more of a 'closed' fibre and resists stains very well. Unfortunately it does not have the nylon's durability and flattens very very quickly, regardless of the thickness used.

    Over the years, polyester carpets are sold with new marketing gimmicks that last for a while (eg recycled bottles) until the warranty claims start to pile up (no pun intended,) the range is discontinued and the cycle starts again with a new name.

    Wool is a very durable fibre and has a natural stain resistance (lanolin) that will protect against everyday wear and tear. It won't protect however against eg cordials, wine etc of any item with food dyes.

    Regarding the construction, there are loop piles and cut piles and combinations of the two. The loop is the strongest as the fibre can act as a spring and if the pile density is decent then it will give many years of service.

    Broadloom carpets are made as a loop and the loop is cut as it is stitched, giving the cut piles such as a twist or a plush. The plush is 'mowed' to give a nice even finish but it shows footprints, vacuuming etc and in wool particularly is prone to watermarking where the pile lays over in sections permanently.

    The twist has a greater texture and achieves a stipple look which reduces the footprints.

    Of the 3 basic styles, the twist (as you have) is a good balance between the wear and durability. It will stand up to flattening better than the plush but not as well as a loop.

    Regarding amount of yarn used, the more yarn per square inch, the less work each individual fibre has to do. This is called pile weight and is why you sometimes see examples such as 80oz etc.

    The old Stainmaster Nylon carpet range had a minimum pile weight of 32oz and was known as a very good performer over the long term.

    Your carpet is 50oz although it looks to be a longer pile.

    Pile density vs length is a balance as in order to make a carpet feel soft, you need movement in the fibre ie gaps between them. This is done by lengthening the pile and opening the space up between the fibres.

    Alternatively you reduce the thickness of the nylon strands in the yarn itself used in the carpet pile (denier). This obviously means the pile weight needs to go up or the carpet will not perform.

    In the case of nysoft (your carpet) I believe they have reduced the denier. It doesn't affect the wear rate, but it does slightly reduce the resistance to matting which is where the fibres fall over.

    Your carpet has been imported hence the 4m wide width and action bac base. From memory these carpets were USA or Belgium origin and Signature are a Victorian based importer and distributor.

    Regarding the warranties, no carpet ever actually wears out in normal use. It falls over and flattens, gets a matted look and is then tossed as it looks ordinary.

    The 20 year wear warranties that have measured abrasive wear have been around for ages and are really not worth much more than good marketing.

    Overall I would suggest you've chosen a good and durable carpet. If you look after it with regular vacuuming (AT LEAST once a week) it shouldn't flatten in walk ways for quite some time.

    Cheers

  • Kezzle176
    WOW two's i couldn't have asked for a better response! Thank you so much for all the time taken and for being so comprehensive, has been really informative, interesting and helpful.
  • me me
    Thank you Twos Company. That gives me a lot of information that I can't get from the carpet stores. Your helpful advices has given my plenty of information on what to look for when I go out to choose.
  • me me
    I have just about settled for this carpet - ec group solution dyed nylon. name - avenue. colour - benson 1143. Do you have any advice about it?
  • PRO
    Two's Company Renovations

    Hi me me

    EC Group are a small Australian mill that were previously known as Edwardstown Carpets. They have traditionally made a good product.

    The carpet you are looking at is a BCF solution dyed nylon. This means that the fibre is a Bulk Continuous Fibre (ie a continuous length) nylon that has had the colour mixed into it while the nylon was still a liquid (and not applied afterwards). It gives it a much greater resistance to staining and soiling (be aware that it has no separate stain treatment) and means that it also resists fading in direct sunlight very well.

    As far as the durability of it is concerned, the ratings have evolved to a two tier level of Extra Heavy Duty now, being a 5 and a 6 star. Avenue is a 5 star which is reflected in its' light commercial rating. Being a 25oz I would say it would be a good performer for bedrooms and living areas but will tend to flatten down in doorways, stairs or passages.

    Without knowing the areas intended we would probably suggest also looking at the Stoney River which is similar but a slightly heavier pile weight and a 6 star rating.

    Being a solution dyed nylon means it also responds well to being steam cleaned which tends to make it 'bloom' again.

    Cheers


  • me me
    Thanks Twos company for this advice. It will be in bedrooms but also hallway and stairs. I will lookmat Stoney River now. Since I made the initial post, I have looked at Langhorne Hut by the same company, however, it doesn't have low voc as one of it's features and I'm thinking that this might be due to the anti stain treatments that it may have undergone. It looks very similar but is commercial rated.
  • me me
    I ended up going for the langhorne hut. It was installed in April, looks great, no odours, and doesn't give off fluff.
  • Kristie Hardy
    Help I was going for a Cavalier Bremworth Foss wool Carpet and was talked into a Nylon ! Has anyone got feedback on Beaulieu imperial range? It’s a nylon and recommended from our local supplier but the reviews are all bad .... I’m so confused !
  • me me
    I wouldn't get it if the reviews are all bad.
  • Rohan Miller Devis

    You should always remember to bring swatches of fabric from drapes and furniture, wallpaper samples, and paint chips with you when you are selecting carpet. That way you can consider a range of colors that will match your existing décor. Remember that color can also affect your mood. Warmer colors often make you feel energized while cooler tones provide a sense of calm.

    When considering color, remember the lighting in the carpet store is not the same as the lighting conditions in your home. Ask the dealer if they have a lighting box in which to view the carpet, or ask if you can take a sample of the carpet home.