watchedpoppy

Unregistered painter paid. How do I get money back?

watchedpoppy
2 years ago

My builder engaged his painter to paint the interior and exterior of my home (a contractor painter). My builder assured me he was licensed as I couldn't find him on the register (I just thought I didn't have his proper name). I've paid $19,000 and all he has done is paint the skirting, cornices, walls and ceiling. I looked him up again as I am not happy with the standard of work. I found out that his company was deregistered in April!!

I'm sure I will not get my money back from the painter as he cannot lie straight in bed with all the porkies he tells about why he couldn't turn up to work and lots of other things. It's been a saga.

Have I got any recourse against my builder or some other avenues to recoup some of my money?

Comments (61)

  • PRO
    Paul Di Stefano Design
    2 years ago

    Just to clarify, the painting amount embedded in the fixed contract shouldn't change regardless of subcontractors used unless the scope of work has been adjusted from what was originally quoted. Let's say the builder has $15K in it for painting scope. If he can get the job done by whoever to satisfaction for $10K, then lucky him he pockets the $5K. If the painter ends up charging him $20K, then too bad he wears the $5K or has to fight about it with the painter. The client still pays $15K as agreed either way, unless (a) the painting has been specified as a PC allowance which is therefore adjustable/variable or (b) extra or less painting scope is instructed. Deductions or increases to the construct sum are only applicable when the scope or specification changes. That's the purpose of fixed contracts. Whenever the builder wears the risk, the client can't expect to have the benefit of refunds. If people want the flexibility of picking up potential savings here and there then they either nominate PC items that can vary up or down or pursue the projects in a Cost-Plus contract which basically means there's no cap/limit and it will cost what it will cost for better or worse. We can't have our cake & eat it in regards to building risk ;)

    Hope it works out/finishes up well for you - you're nearly there and have done well to get through it! Cheers PD

    watchedpoppy thanked Paul Di Stefano Design
    Best Answer
  • HU-333954701
    2 years ago

    Not sure why it says Houzz User instead of Watchedpoppy...but there you go

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  • dreamer
    2 years ago
    Why are you paying the painter???? If you have a contract with the builder, then the builder pays all of the accounts, not you. You should be paying the builder for the works completed, no more. If the builder has subcontracted work to a 'dodgy' builder, then it is the builders problem not yours. I have followed this discussion and just can,t understand why you are paying the painter direct, and why you are expecting to pay more than originally quoted.
    Please revisit your written contract with your builder. If you do not have a written contract......then why?
  • dreamer
    2 years ago
    Hi watchpoppy, ignore my comment, I was typing before refreshing. Glad to see you have paid the builder. I would still only pay for what was in contract for painting. The builder will have to absorb the difference.
    watchedpoppy thanked dreamer
  • PRO
    Paul Di Stefano Design
    2 years ago

    The contract sum should only adjust if there’s a formal variation to the scope of works or if the component is being managed as a PC item. Variations need to be administered in accordance with the contractual terms, which is usually required in writing and needs to be accepted by the owner prior to any action/invoicing. If the painting component is embedded in the contract sum it’s the builder’s issue/responsibility and shouldn’t affect your pocket at all

    watchedpoppy thanked Paul Di Stefano Design
  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Thanks Paul. You're right. It was embedded in the contract but as per other services, the price has gone up or down depending on what we had actually wanted eg. quoted for timber windows but the ones we wanted were uPVC double glazed so we paid extra. The builder has been quite flexible and just really charging for things that he does. If there is anything different to what was contracted then we talk about it.

  • macyjean
    2 years ago

    So it's a new build and your contract is with the builder?

    There is a difference between you deciding that you want to something different to the contract and whatever arrangements the builder has with his sub-contractors.

    If the contract says something and you decide you want something else, of course that is your responsibility.

    Presumably the contract said the house would be handed over to you painted, so that is the builder's responsibility to make happen, no additional cost to you and no refund either.

    I'm confused though, you've said you paid the builder but you originally asked how to recoup your money? The builder is still entitled to his money and the sub-contractor is entitled to his money and the work is required to be done, so isn't that between the builder and his sub-contractor, I'm not sure why you want any money?

  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Macymac my initial thought was that WE had lost the money paid to the builder for the painter, hence my comment that I wanted to recoup my money. But I realise now that the the painter had been subcontracted to the builder. The painter submitted invoices to the builder and I paid the builder. As you say the responsibility is with the builder to ensure our house is painted as per the contract. Given that we have paid say $15,000 already and the job is nowhere near done, the builder has to engage another painter and we will not be further out of pocket... unless the cost of painting goes beyond the $15,000 and then we have to pay more.

    Macymac why would we not be entitled to a refund if the new painter can do the job for less than $15,000? The builder has been charging us for the actual work done, and not to a set amount for each aspect of the build.

    It's not a new build as such. It's an extension to a californian bungalow. The plan is to be in there in 2 weeks..... exciting.

    Is there anything we can do to stop or hinder the shonky (deregistered and unlicensed) painter from doing this to others?

  • dreamer
    2 years ago
    Watchedpoppy, Paul has explained very clearly regarding a contract arrangement. With your last post you've mentioned "builder has been charging us for the actual work done, and not to a set amount for each aspect of the build. " This just makes your situation, contractually and budget wise, difficult.
  • macyjean
    2 years ago

    I think typically a contract for an extension would not be that different to any other build, happy to be corrected?

    But your arrangement, "builder has been charging us for the actual work done, and not to a set amount for each aspect of the build", sounds unusual, as does the idea that any savings that occur will come back to you. The way Paul described it is how I've always understood it works.

    watchedpoppy thanked macyjean
  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Yes PD we have a Cost Plus contract so the price goes up and down depending on what we decide we want as we go. There was an estimate for the painter in the contract. My query is though, as we have paid the builder $15,000 and we have not received $15,000 worth of painting, I assume then that the builder wears the cost until $15,000 of work is done by the new painter (minus the cost for the work done by the shonky painter). Is that correct?

  • PRO
    Paul Di Stefano Design
    2 years ago

    I would guess the builder has been invoicing (as typically/standard) in accordance with the progress payments schedule, each progress invoice issued at specific stages and relative to a certain percentage of the contract such as footings (20%), frame (40%, lock-up (65%) and so on etc.....and this is if course dependant upon the actual work completed - not unusual. What would be unusual however and makes it confusing if the builder enters into conversations with the owner disclosing amounts that are embedded in the contract. This suggests then that they are flexible, when they're actual not. Whilst the builder may have good hearted intentions with full disclosure, sometimes it can backfire and cause confusion with the perception of the respective contractual positions

  • PRO
    Paul Di Stefano Design
    2 years ago

    cost plus is a different story, and here the risks of them are exposed - yes technically you should only pay for what the subcontractor costs. But this is a little tricky in regards to the definition of this painting component. I would guess that the fair way here is that you pay for what you get so if the 2nd painter comes in cheaper then you arguably should get a deduction accordingly - but this would be based on the fact that the first paint quote or work is deemed irrelevant on the grounds of them being incapable or unregistered etc...building can be a messy game and an imperfect science regardless of the contractual terms, and ultimately comes down to integrity of the relationships involved in order to negotiate the process through to completion. As indicated previously open honest discussion with the builder is your best bet to resolve and achieve a fair price. Good luck! PD

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  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Yes Paul the builder has been sending progress payments along the way and sending me copies of the receipts for items purchased, subcontractors invoices etc. He had sent me the shonky painters quote to see if I was happy with that and I said yes proceed. Along the way, the shonky painter sent the builder invoices which I assume the builder paid either before or after I paid the progress payment.

  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Thank you Paul, that confirms my thought process, phew. I think it will work out OK as our builder has integrity and is honest.

  • pottsy99
    2 years ago
    1. Personally , I have always basically been project manager , and employed each specialist for their own skills . It sounds like you employed your builder to be project manager as well as builder . He ( or she ) is charging you possibly some hours for this , plus a margin . You say he is honourable , etc , but it actuallly sounds like he wasn't doing the project management part -- happy to take your $$$ , happy to make a few hundred or a few thousand extra , not so keen to check the progress . As a builder , he should have an idea of how much has been done , and the value , BEFORE paying $$$ .
    2. $15000 is a bigger painting job -- when I get quotes like that , I break it into 2 or 3 parts -- 'here is $1800 for the wall paint , here is $2000 advance for hourly rate , you'll get another $2000 when that part is completed' type deal , then another $1000 for wallpaper or cupboard door paint or next room or whatever . I know its not helping your case , but it's how I operate -- I pay some in advance , but balance on satisfactory completion -- both of us know we are less likely to 'dick' the other , way less stories and excuses .
    3. I certainly hope the builder does honour everything -- no matter how you look at it , morally and probably legally he should put things right . Even if he had simply recommended the painter , and you had dealt direct , I still think he should have partially come to the party .
    4. All the best -- it sucks . I have no idea why people try and rip off others -- why not do a reasonable job , get a recommendation , move on to the next job ?
    watchedpoppy thanked pottsy99
  • Bernadette Staal
    2 years ago

    sorry this has happened to you. I would have a discussion with your local Police and see if they can help you.

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  • PRO
    The Wild Heart Collective Australia
    2 years ago
    Bernadette... technically this is a civil matter with legally binding contracts at play. It’s the dodgy workmanship that is more at question for the amount paid if I understand correctly? That is not a criminal matter. Suing civilly may be a course for Poppy through small claims court if she can not ultimately resolve the issue with her builder ... but as it stands now, it’s between the builder & painter.
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  • Rosey
    2 years ago
    Only pay for a job when the work is completed.
    watchedpoppy thanked Rosey
  • Rosey
    2 years ago
    Apologies. Or pay a progress payment to the level of work completed. If you aren’t happy with level or standard of completion withhold payments until rectified.
    watchedpoppy thanked Rosey
  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Yes I feel like an idiot. You are all absolutely correct. The builder as the project manager should have kept a closer eye on things and pushed things along and checked the quality of work. I got involved in the end because they were painting on the weekend, the builder was not around over the long weekend and we had a deadline to get the inside all painted before the floor sanding. As it is now, the floors are sanded and polished and there is one more top coat to go on the walls and skirting boards (not ideal in the slightest but there you have it).

    I should have been more on the ball with the invoices and saw how much much was being paid to him, knowing full well, now, that that much work had not been done. We are smarter now. The builder should certainly have been managing the shonky painter more. He has worked with him many times before and said that sometimes he goes wayward but comes good in the end..... I told the builder that using that painter will bring his reputation down with the painter. I'm sure the builder will do the right thing.

    Yes Bernadette we are at the angry stage too that this painter may very well get away with it. We are looking into what registration or licensing boards or posts there are that we can use to inform about that painter. Bearing in mind that he is now deregistered and unlicensed.....At the moment we are lying low as the builder is negotiating with the painter getting money back for the painting that was paid for but not done. We are not hopeful in the slightest but he has to try.

    We have 2 new painters coming to quote tomorrow. The plan is now to finish the inside this week and we are set to move in the following week.... it's a race to the finish line now. The outside of the house will get painted when it warms up a bit now. It's a shame but it should be good in the end. Ahh, it had been going too smoothly, why should we be any different? LOL

  • PRO
    The Wild Heart Collective Australia
    2 years ago
    Don’t be so hard on yourself Poppy ...that’s why you engaged a builder in the first place. I feel the whole thing has been very unfair on you but something the builder should have managed more strictly, especially if he was sub contracting trades for other work. Let’s hope your builder pulls himself and (most importantly) you, out of the proverbial poo. Nice to know I’m not the only effluent magnet out there lol ;) hopefully this will all be behind you soon ... and you get your happy ending :)
  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    ahh thank you Nik. Yes always interesting to find solace in another predicament. LOL. I will no doubt nod my head knowingly in the near future as I hear of another story of woe. In the scheme of things this is relatively minor compared to other stories I have heard. Have to keep ones chin up.

    I'm writing a To Do list to share with the builder to ensure things are done before we move in...

  • PRO
    The Wild Heart Collective Australia
    2 years ago

    I didn't want you feeling alone - that perhaps you're a magnet for the yucky brown stuff lol ;) We all live and learn hey ... but it shouldn't have to be that way. We engage the professionals in the hope that they know what they're doing .... because we don't lol! So it sux that this happened to you. A to do list is a grand idea Poppy .... let us know how this ends for you :)

    watchedpoppy thanked The Wild Heart Collective Australia
  • macyjean
    2 years ago

    "We engage the professionals in the hope that they know what they're doing .... because we don't lol!"

    And then we learn the hard way that we need to acquire the expertise to monitor what is being done by the experts whose expertise we are paying for.

    Watchedpoppy, perhaps your builder had good intentions but he certainly didn't earn his money by staying on top of the situation like he is supposed to. I hope it all works out alright. You certainly don't need this sort of delay right before moving in.


    watchedpoppy thanked macyjean
  • PRO
    The Wild Heart Collective Australia
    2 years ago

    So true macy.

  • PRO
    MUSE modern interiors
    2 years ago

    Others have covered the matter quite well, just one other thing though. Whilst it seems that a resolution is near, it is prudent to maintain your own records during the build. Any decisions, variations, issues, action items, etc.. should always be documented, and sent back to the builder asking for confirmation that you understood everything correctly. If nothing else this ensures you are both still on the same page and that there were no misunderstandings about any decisions.

    Builders work on multiple jobs simultaneously, and things that are 'said' can easily be forgotten or overlooked, and in my experience one should never rely solely on others to keep records. Builders are human after all, and mistakes do happen, its how they are resolved that is key.

    Hopefully the matter will get sorted with ease now, but in the case that it all ends up going pear shaped, and you end up in mediation or a builders tribunal court it is important to have a clearly documented log of events.

    I don't know what state you are in, but refer back to your MBA contract for more information on resolution processes... you will find in the small print... :-) all the best with it.

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  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Thanks Muse. Yes I have emailed where possible so that there is a trail. My builder only works on one project at a time which is lucky for me. You are right though as even then things can be forgotten. We had weekly meetings once the demolition finished and I kept notes of the meetings, questions and answers.

    The builder has brought in another painter that he has worked with before to redo the shonky work. The more I look at it the more problems I see... I am also bringing in a painter, that was recommended by a friend, to provide a quote also so that I get a sense of how much the work will cost for the redo and external.

  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Yes Macy and Nic I agree that the builder did not stay on top of the job as much as he should have and we are paying the price in outcome quality. Things need to be rectified and made good. I've made a detailed list to discuss with the builder.

    I'll let you all know how I get on when it's done. Thank you all, I really do appreciate your input and support. :)

  • PRO
    Paul Di Stefano Design
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    sincerely good luck with it watched poppy.........the building game is as much an exercise in people management and communication as it is anything else.....for the record, I'll tell you what the difference is between great builders and the rest of the bunch....and it's not in the workmanship....... It's one single thing: their capacity to resolve issues and shoulder responsibility when the proverbial hits the fan, because issues happen like this on all jobs, it comes with the territory . Hands down this is what sorts out the men from the boys.......we're talking about the building game, we're dealing with humans and let's be honest, on average we're not dealing with the sharpest tools in the shed. It's rugged uneven industry that is complex within itself, but then try and bring it all together with working with/on people's own homes and large amounts of money with multiple areas of cost blow out risk....it's seriously crazy stuff...........After doing this for a long time I can tell you (a) there is rarely a "cheap" way through it and (b) there are only two ways of minimising the risk on projects. First approach is expensive and often beyond either the budget or people's capacity to understand the value before experiencing a project - it involves comprehensive services of architect or design professional engaged to direct and supervise the job from start to finish. The project is documented tightly and the building contract is structured and administered tightly so that money is only paid to the builder once the progress claim has been approved by the supervising architect or administering superintendent. Of course there is a healthy premium involved with this type of "insurance policy" and of course in this case more of than not the actual contract sum is reasonably loaded up as builders will only go into this if there's enough fat in it. BUT you can be confident that at the end of the job you generally do get what was expected/documented without paying more than what was agreed. Second option, if you choose to run the gauntlet alone ie just you and builder, it comes down to sheer luck in that you happen to find a "great" builder for your job, you know, one of those guys you know will shoulder responsibility when it really matters and can inherently trust....so where the hell do those guys exist? Well, they're out there, but rare, often quietly confident, not necessarily the loudest or saying just what people like to hear, they certainly won't be the cheapest option, and like in most other areas, the good ones will eventually move up and onto bigger and better things and unfortunately beyond smaller scale stuff.........let's just say, unless you know them personally or from past experience, they're extremely hard to find!

    Will be interested to hear how it pans out for you - hang in there! :) PD

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  • PRO
    MUSE modern interiors
    2 years ago

    Paul Di Stefano, I couldn't agree more.. the old saying 'you get what you pay for' couldn't be more relevant than in the building game. And even then things slip through the cracks. And you are correct 'It's how those issues are resolved that is crucial.'

    The builder, architect and designer are your partners in this endeavor and you will spend many hours together, which is why I tell my prospective Clients - speak with many builders, designers and architects before you select one. Because 'cost' and the 'quality' are just two factors in determining the success of your project. Shared vision, effective communication, mutual trust, reliability, patience, and how 'your people' approach issue resolution will determine the 'story' of your build journey.

    So as tempting as it is, never select on 'cost' alone.

    Watched Poppy, please let us know how it pans out, and all the best with getting a great outcome! Would love some pics when its all completed!

    watchedpoppy thanked MUSE modern interiors
  • ekweaver
    2 years ago

    That's a horrid situation to be in. I was building also and actually got the builder to sack his painter because of the dreadful work. The builder wanted to give the painter an opportunity to" fix his mess". I made that conditional upon both the builder and painter signing a document that all the floorboards would be replaced if there was more mess, which I knew there would be and so did the builder. The builder accepted to credit back SOME of my money and I got my own painters in. Still it cost me dearly and it needn't have been so from the start. You have recourse via the VBA if the builder refuses to take responsibility to fix and complete the works, or VCAT. Hope you get it sorted and most of your money back.

  • PRO
    Paul Di Stefano Design
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    there is, unfortunately, story after story, after story, after story..........it goes on and on....and stuff like this will continue to happen because , well, simply put, this is the building industry, it's a law unto itself and a mixed bag of the good, the bad, and the deadset ugly.........believe me I've seen it all............rule of thumb - if something stuffs up we're pushing s$%& uphill to remedy it with the same operator, particularly if the price is fixed - if it's not done right the first time and it's clearly a case of lack of capacity rather than lack of communication (which sometimes this in fact can be the culprit) more often than not better to cut the losses and pay to get it done properly with an alternative option - and then the next option isn't ever a guarantee of perfect outcome either......

    I've got hundreds of stories, but one of my favourites is when a plumber fitted off a bathroom, which had a wall basin and of course a nice chrome bottle trap. But he hadn't set it up right so the waste outlet was too low in the wall. So rather than coordinate with the builder/tiler to raise the outlet, he just fitted off the chrome trap with an "extension" piece 300mm long under it that was white PVC....in a $70K bathroom...to cut to the chase the client hit the roof not surprisingly and the plumber's called in to discuss the "issue" - it seriously looked absolutely ridiculous. Plumber's response? "No dramas fellas we can just chrome it up - yeah it'll look a million bucks!"........yep he was serious!

    It's sure risky and beyond frustrating business.....but coming back to earlier comments re great builders and the options available in executing the construction phase with the investment as well protected as it practically can be....there are options/ways of making the process better and less stressful for people, but it does come at a premium.

  • PRO
    The Wild Heart Collective Australia
    2 years ago

    How's things progressing in your world Poppy? I hope you are ok and hanging in there :)

  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago
    ah Paul that's one sad plumber story and I can see it happening. Gave me a laugh.
    Sorry ek to hear of your story too.

    Well I have a new painter with his assistant in there. They are painters that the builder has used before. He didn't offer him first time round as we were on a time frame and he's slower as he's usually on his own. They saw our current situation and shook their heads inn disbelief. These new painters have stripped back some of the walls and did a really GOOD prep, undercoat and top coat. It's a 100% better.
    I'm breathing a sigh of relief and regaining my faith that we will end up with a good result in the end. We have put back our move a week as I did not want these guys to feel rushed.
    As for the builder, he has agreed that it's his fault to fix and make good. The $amount is not known yet, i.e. how much is this painter costing vs what we have paid already.
  • how2girl
    2 years ago

    Oh dear, that sounds very open ended.

  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    It is a bit How2girl, which makes me a bit nervous. I'll have a chat with the builder ard/or painter tomorrow to see what the painter quote was, assuming there was a formal quote asked for and provided.

  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Just an update for all you lovely people who alleviated my initial stages of angst......the second round of painters are still there finishing off the inside. The supposed 3-4day job is into the third week. They have spent good time prepping and the results show. They are due to finish tomorrow and then we start moving in.

    Dare I add that I have to resand the kitchen floor now as there are gouges in it from when the builders moved the fridge into position.... ahh, give me strength

  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Just an update for all you lovely people who alleviated my initial stages of angst......the second round of painters are still there finishing off the inside. The supposed 3-4day job is into the third week. They have spent good time prepping and the results show. They are due to finish tomorrow and then we start moving in. No further discussions with the builder on how the painting costs will end up.

    Dare I add that I have to resand the kitchen floor now as there are gouges in it from when the builders moved the fridge into position.... ahh, give me strength

  • leeannemargaret
    last year

    Good luck!

    I recently had an issue with a local painter. He told me he was registered and I found out after calling Consumer and Business Affairs (he stopped turning up to do the work) that his registration had lapsed quite a while ago. Despite that he had signs at my house advertising his 'business', and set up a Facebook page as well. In the end, the work was completed, but not to an appropriate standard. We have had professional advice from the paint company, who have advised he did not strip the paint right back (it's an 80 year old house) and as a result, we now have bubbles, some quite large, appearing on the woodwork. Despite repeated attempts to contact him, I have been unable to get any response to my calls and texts. I also paid him in cash. I sincerely doubt I will get any money back from him and will need to engage another painter to repaint. An expensive lesson learned, and like you, many sleepless nights and lots of anger.

    watchedpoppy thanked leeannemargaret
  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    last year

    Oh dear Leanne. What another shocker. It really irks me that we can't do enough about these shonky tradesmen. Yes we can complain to a Painters Association but these people are not likely to be members anyway. We can write reviews but I think only if they have a website. Other Houzzers may have suggestions on what to do about these shonksters!


  • PRO
    Paul Di Stefano Design
    last year

    shonky operators are throughout the industry, however more prevalent at the lower end feeding on the smaller scale work........no easy answers to this one I'm afraid

    watchedpoppy thanked Paul Di Stefano Design
  • how2girl
    last year

    and the “associations” are there to protect them, not the customer.

    watchedpoppy thanked how2girl
  • pottsy99
    last year

    I posted some suggestions way back up towards the top of this .


    Firstly , ask friends or family if they have used anyone lately , and would they recommend them -- a good starting point .


    Then get a price , or a price for one part of a job if it is a bigger job .


    Pay part up front , to show you are genuine . Make it clear you will pay the balance on stisfactory completion , or say $1500 nnext week if it is a bigger job . That way , you both know the expectations .


    My final advice -- if they try a sob story -- "We need full payment to pay wages and get paint and paper " -- do not pay , and my advice is do not deal with them . If they don't have an account with the paint supplier , or don't have a credit card , and their business is sailing that close to the wind that they are desperate for your money to pay their bills -- run for the hills .


    Reputable operators should plan their business better , have vredit accounts or a Credit Card at the very least , and have faith in their work . Combined with your part payment , they should not need more until the job is completed IMO .

    watchedpoppy thanked pottsy99
  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    last year

    You are absolutely right pottsy99. Recommendations are certainly the way to go.

  • PRO
    Aus Joinery Kitchens Pty Ltd
    last year

    Totally agree with Pottsy99 if you were to manage that part of your renovation on your own.

    However if it was part of your contract with the builder for him to organize and follow up on the job on your behalf, its all on him. As long as you have the contract which stipulates the details ect..

    Congratulations on your new build and hope it all works out.

    watchedpoppy thanked Aus Joinery Kitchens Pty Ltd
  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    last year
    Yes it has been a trial. We are in our new home and settling in. There's discovery and joy every day as we learn how the new home appliances work, how the light now enters, the use of the abundance of power points, heat evenly distributed throughout the home with air con......
    The inside of the home has been painted, properly and now we wait for the weather to supposedly warm up so we can paint the outside....
  • denisreno
    last year

    I really feel for you. I had a similar experience when a neighbour recommended someone she knew who was 'really good'! He was extremely lazy and, apparently, suffering from depression and he had split up with his girlfriend! He did a dreadful job which took a week - because he was too depressed to work on some days - he only did about half the job and I wasn't impressed. It has ruined my relationship with my neighbour because she knew him to be really good. She won't even come into my place - I assume she doesn't want to see the mess he created! To top it all off (I had paid him cash - fortunately only half of what he 'wanted' (not 'earned') so he wouldn't be paying tax on it )- I didn't get a receipt. He also took my house keys so I had to have the locks replaced. Such a mess and then, I had some tradies through a couple of weeks later for an unrelated job and they asked me when I was getting the place painted? When I told them it had just been done, they really didn't know where to look. I seem to constantly get ripped off, so I'm not getting much done any more - too expensive and depressing.

    watchedpoppy thanked denisreno
  • watchedpoppy
    Original Author
    last year

    Oh dear denisreno. You poor thing. Another terrible experience at the unscrupulous hands of some tradies. Sorry to hear it affected your relationship with your neighbour. Sounds like the fellow may have been good at one time and mentally cannot cope now and you got caught up in it.

    I am very much more now aware of paying for things only when I think it has been earnt. It is difficult sometimes though to do that even when purchasing major items like a lounge and the company wants payment in full BEFORE delivery. Makes me nervous everytime. My outside hasn't been painted yet, I'm mustering up the energy to get some more quotes and keep at it......lol. Have to lol, what else to do but curl up into a ball...

  • denisreno
    last year

    Yes exactly. Good luck with it all and I hope your experience is considerably better than mine!