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Bronwyn Poole of Touch Interiors

I think we are trying to express the same thing here. Maybe just a little confused as I'm approaching it from my professional offering, and you as a homeowner, who may or may not engage professional help. I am in full agreeance that the responsibility of creating your space should never be abdicated to someone else. Although it appears many people are happy to do this, I agree it's far from ideal. Hence my need to offer an alternative service in conjunction with my others. A service that promises to guide, support and appreciate the wants, hopes and desires of the more holistic homeowner. I call it space healing. It's just my pet name for it. Rhi who works with me calls it 'no smoke and mirrors'. Sure there are other designers out there that feel the same need to help in this way. But it's tricky if all the homeowner has to go on is liking their work in order to connect with that designer.

   
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ladyrob1

To Touch Interiors I appreciate your explanation and the soul searching you appear to have done in order to offer me this perspective. I'm a homeowner- once a self employed art teacher and I now teach creative art privately. In general I am one who is compelled to adorning spaces by creating interesting, practical, decorative and uplifting things through the use of colour and shape and ."out of the box" concepts...often including ideas that seem to be attracrive illusions but that are, in reality the "glue" that holds it all together. I tend to indulge in creative abstraction when describing how I feel about decorating a space, so I suppose this is where we've 'come off the rails' so to speak. My concept of anything to do with externalising mine or anyone else's artistic aspirations for a congenial, satisfying environment is that this must hinge on personal likes and dislikes..always and never deviate. I believe that there is a designer (artist) in everyone. True, not everyone is able to externalise their aspirations so needs guidance from people who have spent years accumulating concepts and investigating whatever can be utilised to create something interesting, who are, I suppose, somewhat adept at making a space fit imaginings and feelings....and I grant you, that is not easy, especially since people do not believe in themselves and should be very discriminating when selecting a designer.

Love HOUZZ for the opportunity to find the perfect match! That many are so tentative and disbelieving in self provides an opportunity for an ambitious 'guide' to impose what's trendy, acceptable, accesible, profitable and even their own preferences...in order to put their own style out there... rather than labouring to interpret the clients' desires. I think that this is an area where a designer should tread very carefully if they decide to undertake the specific task of "guide". Designers are aware that there's much more to interior decorating and designing than just the material aspect. Remembering the old adage : "The home is where the heart is", not good to tread wearing boots on people's hearts..its worse than having a flood devastate one's home.

Speaking plainly, not judgementally, based on experience that I would rather not have had, I felt that the term "Space Healing" could appeal a bit too much to the esoteric and could attract clients for the wrong reasons...that your very catchy (and I appreciate catchy) advertising could suggest, granted, inadvertantly on your part, some sort of special intuitive faculty, or psychological approach that could intuit the clients' needs. That may sound quite left of centre, in fact quite out of the ball park, but I've encountered this sort of thing..(.and please know that I am not putting this out here to discredit you or your ingenuity in advertising how you approach your work..why would I?.) Some people...(perhaps those you describe as "happy to abdicate responsibility...etc" or even those who have more money than sense... depending on their choice of designer, can be led to accept something entirely the opposite to what they wanted or envisaged or "felt" and sorely regret it later. This is why Ibelieve that 'guidance' should centre on encouraging people who attend my Colours and Shapes classes to go with what they like one thing at a time...eventually, very often inadvertantly...Surprise!... everything comes together.

I appreciate what you aspire to do for your clients, your advertising is clever.... and I do wish you all the success that your innovative 'bent' can draw your way!

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Bronwyn Poole of Touch Interiors

I'm hearing you. I agree that knowing what you like is solid advice for the typical homeowner. It's the best possible start. This along with advice from someone who really understands space is invaluable. The space must be considered in equal measure however and this is an art, often developed of years. No doubt someone who has your training can rely on instinct and it will work out in the end. From my experience this is rarely the case for the average homemaker. They purchase because they like the piece and often live with regret, paralyzed to move forward as they don't know how to fix it. Of course it can be fixed. Nothing is ever a mistake in my book, just an opportunity for more authentic and original self expression. My current mission is to build up a data base of Aussie designers who are inspired to help homeowners in the way you and I feel is truly meaningful, (without treading on people's hearts)....so so important. This is my start http://www.completepad.com.au/pages/the-perfect-stylist-for-you


Hey, I would love to learn more about the course you do.Email me.


   

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