013.Rose Pruning Tips

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noellejohnson
Noelle Johnson Landscape Consulting added this to Trim Time: Shape Up Your Garden With Proper Pruning Practices11 February 2018

Loppers: The large bypass blades of this garden tool cut through branches that are 2 to 5 centimetres in diameter. They have long handles, which enable the user to prune tree branches and also reach into the interior of shrubs. A pair of loppers is a great tool for pruning back rose bushes.

carolbucknell
Carol Bucknell Garden Design added this to Top 10 Things to Do in the Garden in July21 June 2015

Basic rules for rose pruning:Use clean, sharp tools. Blunt secateurs and loppers can cause ragged cuts that encourage disease. Start by removing old, diseased or spindly stems, then focus on shape. You’re aiming for a vase shape with no crowded, crossing branches in the middle of the plant. Cut above a bud on the outside of the stem, sloping the cut away from the bud so moisture drains away from it.

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123twinsparkles
Nancy Hanie_Mann added this to Pruning trees and Shurbs12 February 2018

Loppers for pruning plants like Roses

smtpearson
Michelle Pearson added this to Garden Plants4 July 2016

Basic rules for rose pruning: ◦Use clean, sharp tools. Blunt secateurs and loppers can cause ragged cuts that encourage disease. ◦Start by removing old, diseased or spindly stems, then focus on shape. You’re aiming for a vase shape with no crowded, crossing branches in the middle of the plant. ◦Cut above a bud on the outside of the stem, sloping the cut away from the bud so moisture drains away from it.

jncastillo173
jncastillo173 added this to jnc ideas1 May 2013

Chuang's husband, Chi Ning Liu, cuts off a woody, central cane at its origin. This allows younger, healthier canes to thrive and opens up the center of the rosebush, promoting airflow and circulation. How to Prune Roses While expert demonstrations, extensive reading and planning are helpful preparation for pruning, nothing educates you like hands-on experience. You may prune too much or too little, but roses are resilient, and they’ll grow back. Leave healthy, major canes. First, cut off dead or dying canes to their origin. Get in there with the saw if necessary, says Chuang. The sure sign of a healthy cane is a rich green bark and a solid white core. Older rosebushes may get woody, so pick and choose the canes that you would like to keep. The American Rose Society suggests leaving four or five major canes for hybrid teas and grandifloras; more for floribunas. Cut off dying canes, even if healthy canes shoot off them. You want to ensure a healthy rose plant, above all. Then you want to think about shape. Chuang says she’ll cut canes smaller than the diameter of her pinkie finger. New growth will be thinner than its origin, so thin stems will produce even thinner, weaker stems, unable to support the weight of the rose. Tip: If you cut healthy canes off, put the stem in the ground and stake it. The stem may sprout roots and form a secondary plant.