Coleus Solenostemon 'Florida Gold'Traditional Garden, New York

Photo by Ivo M. Vermeulen

Photo of a traditional garden in New York. —  Houzz
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dbegonia
dbegonia added this to Landscape Ideas21 February 2018

Though coleus has made its reputation as a houseplant, this fast-growing tender perennial will quickly fill in shady spots in the summer garden, reaching up to 3 feet tall. Unless you live in a tropical area, treat it as an annual. You can also bring cuttings of your favorites indoors before the first frost and root them so you’ll have them ready to go for the following year. The New York Botanical Garden Email Save ‘Florida Gold’ coleus Choose a partially shady spot, unless you’re growing one of the newer sun-loving cultivars; plants in full shade may not grow as vigorously. You can grow coleus from seed, but cuttings or seedlings will become established more quickly. Provide fertile, well-draining soil that will stay moist but not soggy, and feed on a monthly basis with a half-strength, water-soluble, high-nitrogen fertilizer. Pinch the stems to encourage branching, and remove the light blue flowers when they appear. Caution: Toxic if eaten by pets Origin: Southeast Asia Where it will grow: Hardy to 30 degrees Fahrenheit, or minus 1.1 degrees Celsius (Zone 10 and above); grow as an annual in most gardens Mature size: 10 to 36 inches tall Water requirement: Regular to ample Light requirement: Partial to full shade; some newer cultivars can handle full sun When to plant: Spring, after the danger of frost has passed and the evening temperature is at least 60 degrees Fahrenheit, or 15.6 degrees Celsius; or start seeds indoors up to eight weeks before the last frost date

lynnjoseph
lynnjoseph added this to shade garden21 February 2018

Florida Gold’ coleus Choose a partially shady spot, unless you’re growing one of the newer sun-loving cultivars; plants in full shade may not grow as vigorously. You can grow coleus from seed, but cuttings or seedlings will become established more quickly. Provide fertile, well-draining soil that will stay moist but not soggy, and feed on a monthly basis with a half-strength, water-soluble, high-nitrogen fertilizer. Pinch the stems to encourage branching, and remove the light blue flowers when they appear.

nadeanez
Nadeane added this to Plants And Shrubs19 February 2018

‘Florida Gold’ coleusChoose a partially shady spot, unless you’re growing one of the newer sun-loving cultivars; plants in full shade may not grow as vigorously. You can grow coleus from seed, but cuttings or seedlings will become established more quickly. Provide fertile, well-draining soil that will stay moist but not soggy, and feed on a monthly basis with a half-strength, water-soluble, high-nitrogen fertilizer. Pinch the stems to encourage branching, and remove the light blue flowers when they appear.Caution: Toxic if eaten by petsOrigin: Southeast AsiaWhere it will grow: Hardy to 30 degrees Fahrenheit, or minus 1.1 degrees Celsius (Zone 10 and above); grow as an annual in most gardensMature size: 10 to 36 inches tallWater requirement: Regular to ample Light requirement: Partial to full shade; some newer cultivars can handle full sunWhen to plant: Spring, after the danger of frost has passed and the evening temperature is at least 60 degrees Fahrenheit, or 15.6 degrees Celsius; or start seeds indoors up to eight weeks before the last frost date

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