Passive House RetreatCountry Exterior, Providence

WINNER
- AIA/BSA Design Award 2012
- 2012 EcoHome Design Award
- PRISM 2013 Award

This LEED Gold certified vacation residence located in a beautiful ocean community on the New England coast features high performance and creative use of space in a small package. ZED designed the simple, gable-roofed structure and proposed the Passive House standard. The resulting home consumes only one-tenth of the energy for heating compared to a similar new home built only to code requirements.

Architecture | ZeroEnergy Design
Construction | Aedi Construction
Photos | Greg Premru Photography

Photo of a country red exterior in Providence with a gable roof. —  Houzz
Related Photo Topics
This photo has 3 questions

What Houzz contributors are saying:

bagnatoarchitects
Bagnato Architecture & Interiors added this to Building to a Budget: 12 Must-Know Design Considerations24 February 2017

3. The shape of the buildingKeeping the form of your building to a simple shape will have a ripple effect across the whole construction process, saving money and keeping your budget in check. Having fewer twists and turns in the shape of the building allows each of the individual trades such as bricklayers, carpenters and concreters to work faster and more efficiently, and the cost savings are passed onto the client. Curved walls are at the other end of the scale, so stick to straight lines if you can.

susanredmanryan
Susan Redman added this to Opposites Attract: Complementary Colour Combos29 August 2015

Use the landscapeThe saturation of colour looks particularly appealing outdoors – a red barn-shaped house on a verdant green lawn creates an extraordinary contrast of colour and shape against the intense blue of sky. TELL USDo you like to use complementary colours designing and decorating your home? What is your favourite complementary pair? Tell us in the comments section.MOREHow to Be Truly Confident With ColourWinter Warmers: Colour Forecast 2015Perfect Pairs: 8 Colour Palettes That Won’t Let You Down

tashshaw
Natasha Shaw added this to The Construction Process: 7 Must-Dos Before You Start to Build16 June 2014

6. Consider construction implications before you start During a recent renovation, one homeowner (who was working without a designer) realised that opening up the main floor of her house required a structural engineer, which caused delays as she searched for an engineer and he did his drawings. So it’s important to understand what the construction implications will be to get the space you want. Even though it cost her approximately $7000 more to open up the space, she was really glad she went ahead with this part of the project. An architect would have been able to point this out before construction started and would have avoided the stress and extra costs involved in undoing some work in the middle of the project.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

amy_learwhite
amy_learwhite added this to Home library and TV room ideas and design4 October 2021

Favorite versions of red, blue, green

barbara_bahnmann36
Barbara Bahnmann added this to House Exterior4 April 2021

House side example - cement board, wood frame - red

lindenavery
lindenavery added this to House Plan Thinking12 June 2020

3. The shape of the building Keeping the form of your building to a simple shape will have a ripple effect across the whole construction process, saving money and keeping your budget in check. Having fewer twists and turns in the shape of the building allows each of the individual trades such as bricklayers, carpenters and concreters to work faster and more efficiently, and the cost savings are passed onto the client.

trevor_hardcastle45
Trevor Hardcastle added this to Trevor's ideas26 December 2019

Love scandanavian overhangs like this

Exteriors with Similar Colours
Southern Plantation
VILLA E
Sanderson Family Farmhouse
Fire Island A-Frame
Geometric Contemporary Backyard Exterior View
Grade 2* Listed Country House
Деревянный дом под Звенигородом
埼玉県熊谷市の家