Taringa PavilionContemporary Exterior, Brisbane

Alicia Taylor Photography

Inspiration for a small contemporary one-storey white exterior in Brisbane with wood siding. —  Houzz
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What Houzz contributors are saying:

georgia4321
Georgia Madden added this to Best of the Week: 31 Australian Heritage-Style Home Facades28 August 2019

18. Location: Brisbane, QueenslandDesigner: Nielsen WorkshopFeatures: A contemporary extension that makes no apology for contrasting with the classic lines of this heritage Queenslander. A risk that we’d say pays off.

joanna_tovia
Joanna Tovia added this to Best of the Week: 19 Standout Home Extensions4 January 2018

6. Location: Taringa, QueenslandWhy we love it: Not all extensions have to be to the rear, and not all of them need to include an enclosed living space. This heritage-listed Queenslander is located on a corner block, which opened up possibilities to build alongside rather than behind the home.

vanessalwalker
Vanessa Walker added this to 5 Common Side Effects of Doing a Renovation17 December 2017

Side effect 1: Extending your ‘vision’You started off simply updating your kitchen. Then as the project took form, you decided you’d like to tackle your dining area as well. And your downstairs powder room. And your hall. The problem with improving one part of your home is that it swiftly throws into light how ‘shabby’ the rest of your place looks in comparison. If you already have a competent team of builders, painters and carpenters across your threshold, it’s all too tempting to retain them for a few more weeks.But (and there are many buts), extending your vision means you’ll inevitably require a bigger (possibly much bigger) budget. Falling prey to this common side effect also means your original schedule will need to be completely redrawn. Ultimately, it will leave you with no privacy for months on end and, in the worst-case scenario, in serious financial dire straits.The cure: Practise acceptance. Like painting the Harbour Bridge, doing up your home is an endless task. It is unlikely that all parts of your house will look freshly decorated and stylish at the same time. Take a long hard look at your bank account. Do you like eating? Being able to turn on your air conditioning? Unless you are blessed with bottomless funds, then it’s a good idea to not get too carried away. As we all know, budgets have a habit of spiralling – and as your vision ‘extends’ this is only going to get worse. All that said, extending your vision a little isn’t necessarily always a bad thing. It can be cheaper this way, as doing multiple jobs in one go is usually more cost effective than bringing a team in for lots of smaller, separate jobs at different times. The trick is to plan and keep things in perspective. Will the extra cost and time be worth it? Is the extra work a necessity or a luxury? And are you simply getting carried away? Only you can say.Find a builder to help you

joanna_tovia
Joanna Tovia added this to 9 Ultra-Contemporary Extensions That Stand Out and Proud26 September 2016

3. Compare and contrastWhen your block is wide rather than deep, any additions you make to the house will be visible from the street. The architects of this modern addition made no apologies when designing a contemporary addition to sit alongside a traditional Brisbane home. And why should they?

What Houzzers are commenting on:

bruce_low93
Creative Pursuits Pty Ltd added this to Design Ideas23 January 2018

Extension to the side and open air

shanepickford
Shane Pickford added this to shanepickford's Ideas21 January 2018

6. Location: Taringa, QueenslandWhy we love it: Not all extensions have to be to the rear, and not all of them need to include an enclosed living space. This heritage-listed Queenslander is located on a corner block, which opened up possibilities to build alongside rather than behind the home.

akiyo716
akiyo716 added this to from outside20 January 2018

6. Location: Taringa, QueenslandWhy we love it: Not all extensions have to be to the rear, and not all of them need to include an enclosed living space. This heritage-listed Queenslander is located on a corner block, which opened up possibilities to build alongside rather than behind the home.

vanessalwalker
Vanessa Walker added this to Stark Contrasts: A Tour of Heritage Homes with Modern Additions16 May 2017

So what exactly do we mean when we talk about this take on modern conversions? The key features to look out for are two distinct styles, with no attempt to mask the difference. Both styles get equal spotlight and aren’t compromised. They are obvious at first glance; their differences celebrated. These additions tend towards clean lines and geometric shapes; they highlight modern forms and materials. They sit in contrast with the detailed, often romantic, character of heritage and historical homes.NEED TO SPEAK TO THE HOME PICTURED..This xxxx home, by nielsen workshop,

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