Double Gable Eichler RemodelMidcentury Patio, San Francisco

This is an example of a midcentury courtyard patio in San Francisco with tile and no cover. —  Houzz
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This photo has 2 questions
pjben6364Taylor'd DISTINCTION wrote:25September,2015
  • PRO
    Klopf Architecture
    5 years ago

    This is a Japamese Maple. It's enjoying its new surroundings, since it was there prior to the remodel.

  • Jeannie
    5 years ago

    We had a similar courtyard to the Eichler shown, but found the wind [we get a lot here near the coast] created a vortex. My husband converted it into an acrylic roofed courtyard with a commercial cooling unit for my many plants who needed the humidity. For very hot days he put in canvas [duck cloth?] draw blinds, and when finished we spent most of our time there. The end result got us a 2 page spread in Australian House and Garden magazine.


sonja_wright43Sonja Wright wrote:28June,2016
  • PRO
    Klopf Architecture
    4 years ago

    Your question is outside our area of expertise, but I can tell you the tree is a Japanese Maple. My recommendation would be to talk with a local nursery or landscape professional about the species and your idea for potting it. Good luck!

What Houzz contributors are saying:

carolbucknell
Carol Bucknell Garden Design added this to 12 Best Plants for Small Urban Gardens14 March 2016

2. Japanese mapleFor graceful form in a courtyard, balcony or large container, you can’t beat Japanese maples (Acer palmatum). Their delicate leaves come in many colours, as do their stems, so there’s plenty to enjoy even during winter.Shelter from wind is important for these deciduous trees and they’re not fond of very hot conditions.Use as a focal point, in pots or against a plain wall where their stunning foliage can be seen at its best.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

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Molly added this to Aberdeen Exterior Ideas18 March 2021

courtyard makes outside feel part of the house