Dining Room Design Ideas

Dining Room Styling
Dining Room Styling
Lisa Hunter Interiors
This is an example of an eclectic dining room in Melbourne.
Kingsley Additions
Kingsley Additions
Sketch Building Design
This is an example of a modern dining room in Melbourne.
SWANBROOK
SWANBROOK
BSM Building Pty Ltd
This is an example of a contemporary dining room in Brisbane.
Harris Street
Harris Street
Sartorial Interiors
Photo of a small eclectic dining room in Sydney with blue walls and vinyl floors.
Metropolitan at Googong
Metropolitan at Googong
McDonald Jones Homes
Grandeur on Every Level. Offering the thoughtful design features you’d normally only expect from a bespoke home, the Metropolitan is the ultimate in two-storey, luxury family living. The Metropolitan is a lavish two storey design with a Master Suite of Hollywood proportions and a layout. The Metropolitan respects the duties of everyday life and rewards with simple luxuries. Catering even for narrow blocks, this home effortlessly ticks every box on the wish list.
The Wright House
The Wright House
Mesh Design Projects
Open plans living, dining and kitchen area. Off-form concrete ceiling, rendered wall and large format floor tiling
Inspiration for a large contemporary open plan dining in Perth with grey walls, porcelain floors, brown floor and wood.
Commercial rd
Commercial rd
Maria Savelieva Photography
Maria Savelieva Photography
This is an example of a contemporary dining room in Melbourne.
Randwick Apartment – Before/After
Randwick Apartment – Before/After
Advantage Interior Design
This is an example of a contemporary dining room in Sydney.
Noosa Dunes House
Noosa Dunes House
Aboda Design Group
This is an example of a contemporary kitchen/dining combo in Sunshine Coast with white walls, light hardwood floors and beige floor.
Buderim #3
Buderim #3
Menzie Designer Homes Pty Ltd
Lucas Muro frames the steep site and immense views captured by award winning designers Aboda Design Group.
Inspiration for a beach style dining room in Sunshine Coast.
Ancona, Donaldsons Road
Ancona, Donaldsons Road
Steve Domoney Architecture
Contemporary dining room in Melbourne with beige walls, concrete floors and grey floor.
Internal Renovations
Internal Renovations
Dinastia Master Builders
Photo of a transitional dining room in Sydney.
Winthrop Custom Built II
Winthrop Custom Built II
Putragraphy
Photo of a contemporary open plan dining in Perth with grey walls, medium hardwood floors and brown floor.
Brickworks Inspiration
Brickworks Inspiration
Brickworks Building Products
Industrial dining room in Sydney with brown walls, grey floor and wood walls.
Hanley Villa
Hanley Villa
Studio aem
Transitional dining room in Sydney.
Contemporary Dining Room
Contemporary Dining Room
Inspiration for a contemporary kitchen/dining combo in Sydney with concrete floors, no fireplace and grey floor.
Teal Ave Duplex
Teal Ave Duplex
Luxbuilt
This is an example of a contemporary dining room in Gold Coast - Tweed with white walls, light hardwood floors and beige floor.
House O
House O
F3 Studio
Photo of a contemporary dining room in Melbourne.
Sunshine Beach House
Sunshine Beach House
Aboda Design Group
Design ideas for a mid-sized contemporary open plan dining in Sunshine Coast with white walls, medium hardwood floors and brown floor.
Armadale House
Armadale House
Tom Robertson Architects
Lillie Thompson
This is an example of a mid-sized contemporary open plan dining in Melbourne with white walls, light hardwood floors, no fireplace and beige floor.
A dining room can be used for casual dining, integrated into an open plan and connected to the living and kitchen areas; or as a formal space reserved solely for entertaining. While it may not be used frequently, it is a great focal point in the home, and requires little furnishings. Here's what you need to consider before you start planning a new dining room...

How will you use your dining room?


First, consider how frequently you will use the space. If you plan on using your dining room on a daily basis, a casual dining set-up with sturdy, long-lasting furniture is best. As for where you position it – well, any unused space in the home can be converted into a casual dining space, whether it be at the end of a kitchen island, or at the bottom of the stairs. A formal dining room, on the other hand, is more suited to a dedicated space, which is more common in heritage homes where space originally wasn’t at a premium.

Perhaps you want your dining room to multi-task and accommodate everyday meals, homework sessions and grown-up dinner parties… If that’s the case, furniture is key. Look for versatile dining tables in either Australian or New Zealand hardwood or weathered timber for a more rustic look. These won’t show up sticky fingerprints as much and can be dressed up for guests.

What size and shape should your dining table be?


Your dining table should be able to seat all family members with some room for additional guests – each person should have at least 60 centimetres of space at the table. The right size, however, also depends on how much room you have. A general rule of thumb is to leave no less than 1 metre from the dining table to the wall or any additional furniture, so people have enough room to comfortably move around the space.

Rectangular dining tables are versatile and can work in a variety of settings, while oval dining tables are more traditional and can turn any meal into an occasion. If you have a tight space to work in, a round dining table is best, and also a great option if you want to encourage conversation. A square dining table can be a dramatic addition to a dining room, but only if you have the space. It allows everyone at the table to see each other, but the bigger the table, the harder it will be able to hold a conversation with someone at the other end.

What type of dining chairs should you choose?


Once you’ve decided on a dining table, look for dining chairs that share a common design element. If your dining table legs are curved, for example, try to match them with dining chairs that have a similar curve, either in the legs or back. Next, consider the dimensions of the chair. The height of your dining chairs should allow at least 30 centimetres between the top of the seat and the top of the table. And to keep your tush happy, avoid dining chairs narrower than 45 centimetres.

How can you decorate your dining room?


Dining rooms are relatively minimal spaces, but that makes them a great place to splash a little colour through artwork, especially if yours is a formal dining room. If your dining room is lacking warmth, consider painting the walls a deep shade of red or blue, or go contemporary with black or grey. A cosy rug will make the space feel more intimate, while a sideboard or cabinet of curiosities will further personalise the space.

Often overlooked, dining room lighting can also drastically alter the mood of a room, creating drama, spurring romance or encouraging conversation. Opt for soft lighting in the dining area with dimmer switches, and choose oversized pendants in large, open spaces or to make the dining area more of a focal point. Finally, add some table settings, such as a lace tablecloth for a whimsy feel, or a more basic table runner for a chic look.

If you need some help designing your dining room, consider checking the Houzz directory of interior designers, home stylists, cabinet makers and more!

Whether you want inspiration for planning a dining room renovation or are building a designer dining room from scratch, Houzz has 732,912 images from the best designers, decorators, and architects in the country, including Sketch Building Design and Dinastia Master Builders. Look through dining room photos in different colours and styles and when you find a dining room design that inspires you, save it to an Ideabook or contact the Pro who made it happen to see what kind of design ideas they have for your home. Explore the beautiful dining room ideas photo gallery and find out exactly why Houzz is the best experience for home renovation and design.