Exterior Design Ideas

River House, Carlton, Tasmania
River House, Carlton, Tasmania
Beachouse
Peter Mathew
Inspiration for a beach style one-storey multi-coloured house exterior in Hobart with mixed siding, a shed roof and a metal roof.
Contemporary Exterior
Contemporary Exterior
Inspiration for a contemporary two-storey multi-coloured house exterior in Perth with a gable roof.
Hamptons - Contemporary Luxury Home
Hamptons - Contemporary Luxury Home
Cordony Group
Design ideas for a large beach style two-storey white house exterior in Sydney with a gable roof, a tile roof and a black roof.
Pacific House
Pacific House
Slater Architects
The brief for this beachfront renovation was to use the bones and keep the theme of the existing weatherboard beach house and convert it into a modern light-filled coastal home that maximised the beach vistas. Using recycled timber and sandstone tied in with the coastal theme and blended with the natural environment.
Marmion Street House
Marmion Street House
Philip Stejskal Architecture
Design ideas for an industrial two-storey multi-coloured house exterior in Perth with a flat roof.
Luxe 437
Luxe 437
ArdenHomes
Contemporary exterior in Melbourne.
E&L - Renovation
E&L - Renovation
Big House Little House
Country two-storey white house exterior in Brisbane with a gable roof, vinyl siding and a metal roof.
Traditional Timber Frames
Traditional Timber Frames
Complete Home Design
This is an example of a mid-sized tropical one-storey brown house exterior in Wollongong with a gable roof.
Berrima, NSW country/contemporary build
Berrima, NSW country/contemporary build
Charm Homes
Design ideas for a country one-storey grey house exterior in Wollongong with a hip roof and a metal roof.
Box House
Box House
Fluxe Architecture Studio
REMpros
Contemporary split-level white house exterior in Gold Coast - Tweed with stone veneer and a flat roof.
Project - Sussex ft. Austral Bricks
Project - Sussex ft. Austral Bricks
Brickworks Building Products
Photo of a mid-sized modern house exterior in Melbourne.
CARRARA WATERS
CARRARA WATERS
Stuart Osman
Andy Macpherson Studio
This is an example of a contemporary two-storey grey house exterior in Gold Coast - Tweed with mixed siding and a flat roof.
White Street
White Street
Daniela Fulford Photography
Design ideas for a traditional exterior in Melbourne.
The Strand
The Strand
Urbane Projects Pty Ltd
Photo of a contemporary exterior in Perth.
Spice Residence
Spice Residence
Nathan Verri Pty Ltd
Photo of a tropical two-storey brown house exterior in Cairns with a hip roof and a tile roof.
Eco Outdoor | Feature Project | PR House
Eco Outdoor | Feature Project | PR House
Eco Outdoor AUS
Architect: Architects Ink Photographer: Sam Noonan Photography
Inspiration for a midcentury two-storey grey house exterior in Sydney with mixed siding and a flat roof.
Melville
Melville
Evolution Build + Renovate + Extend
Design ideas for a contemporary exterior in Perth.
Jamieson 30
Jamieson 30
Brighton Homes
Inspiration for a contemporary one-storey white house exterior in Brisbane with mixed siding, a hip roof and a metal roof.
Beach House at Avoca Beach by Architecture Saville Isaacs
Beach House at Avoca Beach by Architecture Saville Isaacs
Architecture Saville Isaacs
Exterior - Rear Beach House at Avoca Beach by Architecture Saville Isaacs Project Summary Architecture Saville Isaacs https://www.architecturesavilleisaacs.com.au/ The core idea of people living and engaging with place is an underlying principle of our practice, given expression in the manner in which this home engages with the exterior, not in a general expansive nod to view, but in a varied and intimate manner. The interpretation of experiencing life at the beach in all its forms has been manifested in tangible spaces and places through the design of pavilions, courtyards and outdoor rooms. Architecture Saville Isaacs https://www.architecturesavilleisaacs.com.au/ A progression of pavilions and courtyards are strung off a circulation spine/breezeway, from street to beach: entry/car court; grassed west courtyard (existing tree); games pavilion; sand+fire courtyard (=sheltered heart); living pavilion; operable verandah; beach. The interiors reinforce architectural design principles and place-making, allowing every space to be utilised to its optimum. There is no differentiation between architecture and interiors: Interior becomes exterior, joinery becomes space modulator, materials become textural art brought to life by the sun.   Project Description Architecture Saville Isaacs https://www.architecturesavilleisaacs.com.au/ The core idea of people living and engaging with place is an underlying principle of our practice, given expression in the manner in which this home engages with the exterior, not in a general expansive nod to view, but in a varied and intimate manner. The house is designed to maximise the spectacular Avoca beachfront location with a variety of indoor and outdoor rooms in which to experience different aspects of beachside living. Client brief: home to accommodate a small family yet expandable to accommodate multiple guest configurations, varying levels of privacy, scale and interaction. A home which responds to its environment both functionally and aesthetically, with a preference for raw, natural and robust materials. Maximise connection – visual and physical – to beach. The response was a series of operable spaces relating in succession, maintaining focus/connection, to the beach. The public spaces have been designed as series of indoor/outdoor pavilions. Courtyards treated as outdoor rooms, creating ambiguity and blurring the distinction between inside and out. A progression of pavilions and courtyards are strung off circulation spine/breezeway, from street to beach: entry/car court; grassed west courtyard (existing tree); games pavilion; sand+fire courtyard (=sheltered heart); living pavilion; operable verandah; beach. Verandah is final transition space to beach: enclosable in winter; completely open in summer. This project seeks to demonstrates that focusing on the interrelationship with the surrounding environment, the volumetric quality and light enhanced sculpted open spaces, as well as the tactile quality of the materials, there is no need to showcase expensive finishes and create aesthetic gymnastics. The design avoids fashion and instead works with the timeless elements of materiality, space, volume and light, seeking to achieve a sense of calm, peace and tranquillity. Architecture Saville Isaacs https://www.architecturesavilleisaacs.com.au/ Focus is on the tactile quality of the materials: a consistent palette of concrete, raw recycled grey ironbark, steel and natural stone. Materials selections are raw, robust, low maintenance and recyclable. Light, natural and artificial, is used to sculpt the space and accentuate textural qualities of materials. Passive climatic design strategies (orientation, winter solar penetration, screening/shading, thermal mass and cross ventilation) result in stable indoor temperatures, requiring minimal use of heating and cooling. Architecture Saville Isaacs https://www.architecturesavilleisaacs.com.au/ Accommodation is naturally ventilated by eastern sea breezes, but sheltered from harsh afternoon winds. Both bore and rainwater are harvested for reuse. Low VOC and non-toxic materials and finishes, hydronic floor heating and ventilation ensure a healthy indoor environment. Project was the outcome of extensive collaboration with client, specialist consultants (including coastal erosion) and the builder. The interpretation of experiencing life by the sea in all its forms has been manifested in tangible spaces and places through the design of the pavilions, courtyards and outdoor rooms. The interior design has been an extension of the architectural intent, reinforcing architectural design principles and place-making, allowing every space to be utilised to its optimum capacity. There is no differentiation between architecture and interiors: Interior becomes exterior, joinery becomes space modulator, materials become textural art brought to life by the sun. Architecture Saville Isaacs https://www.architecturesavilleisaacs.com.au/ https://www.architecturesavilleisaacs.com.au/
Manly West
Manly West
Nest Bespoke Homes
Inspiration for a contemporary one-storey grey house exterior in Brisbane with mixed siding and a flat roof.
The front exterior of your home – the driveway, front yard, verandah and entrance – is a fantastic place to start making that all-important first impression on house guests. Even mailboxes and house numbers can have a wonderful way of grabbing people’s attention. The architectural design should reflect the overall style of your house and the family that live there; while your choice of materials will help your house blend in with its surrounds.

Browse the photos on Houzz for ideas and inspiration for the exterior of your house, and strike up a conversation with the architects and designers of your favourite picks. You’ll find house designs for contemporary, eclectic, modern, traditional styles and more.

How do I decide on the exterior style of my home?


Your location, overall sense of style, budget and current home layout will dictate the style of your exterior. If you’re renovating a period home, the materials and features you use should reflect the date in which it was built, while a unique colour scheme could add contemporary flair.

New homes may prefer to look to modern or contemporary designs with structural simplicity, whereas, if you live by the ocean, a beach-style design may better suit your locale. That’s not to say you can’t build a new home that has period influences. If you’re a traditionalist, you can borrow architectural details from the Art Deco period, for instance, or use finishes that reflect more of a Scandinavian style, too.

What exterior house colours and materials should I use?


Traditional homes typically use brick and timber building materials, while stone, board-formed concrete and metal cladding are popular contemporary options. Again, the materials you use will depend on your location and the statement you want to make. Your budget will also affect your choice. Vinyl siding is affordable and easy to install, while stone is more expensive but durable and low maintenance.

If you’re not ready to renovate but want to update the exterior of your home, you can still paint it. Look to your neighbours when choosing exterior house colours. Consider the streetscape and what type of colours are already in use, firstly, so you don’t replicate next door’s shade; and secondly, so you don’t stand out like a sore thumb. If you’re renovating a period home, you could paint features or intricate details in a bold, standout hue. Front doors, garage doors and window trims also look great in eye-catching colours, even if the rest of the house’s facade is neutral.

How can I maximise my home’s street appeal?


To spice up your home’s architectural design, landscape the surrounding area with plants and pathways that accent the style of your home. If you just need a quick revamp, look at your cement and pavers – these can split and crack over time; and repairing or replacing them can do wonders for your street appeal, especially if it’s a large area like your driveway. Plants, garden paths or low walls can can also add structure to your front yard.

Light up your home with sufficient outdoor lighting to make walking up to the front door easy at night. You could use bollard lights along your entry path, or replace tiny wall sconces with statement pendant lighting at the entrance or on your verandah. Decorative elements such as house numbers, mailboxes and doormats will also add character. And if you're looking to sell your house, it may be worth hiring a stylist to help make the most of your property.

Whether you want inspiration for planning an exterior renovation or are building a designer exterior from scratch, Houzz has 1,298,583 images from the best designers, decorators, and architects in the country, including Brighton Homes and Cordony Group. Look through exterior photos in different colours and styles and when you find an exterior design that inspires you, save it to an Ideabook or contact the Pro who made it happen to see what kind of design ideas they have for your home. Explore the beautiful exterior ideas photo gallery and find out exactly why Houzz is the best experience for home renovation and design.