Exterior Design Ideas

Rothesay Ave Glenelg North
Rothesay Ave Glenelg North
Stage and Style Co
Photo of a contemporary two-storey multi-coloured house exterior in Adelaide with a flat roof.
Wilston House
Wilston House
Plot Architecture
Inspiration for a beach style exterior in Brisbane.
Tarragindi House
Tarragindi House
Focus Architecture
Contemporary two-storey black house exterior in Brisbane with mixed siding and a flat roof.
Bell Residence
Bell Residence
Create Architecture
Design ideas for a contemporary two-storey multi-coloured house exterior in Gold Coast - Tweed with a flat roof.
Kissing Point Road
Kissing Point Road
DesignBuild Project Services
Inspiration for a contemporary exterior in Sydney.
Mika 35 - Providence - South Ripley
Mika 35 - Providence - South Ripley
Brighton Homes
Design ideas for a beach style one-storey white house exterior in Brisbane with mixed siding, a hip roof and a metal roof.
Tallebudgera
Tallebudgera
MRA Design
Inspiration for a contemporary one-storey white house exterior in Gold Coast - Tweed with a flat roof.
Epping House
Epping House
Justin Loe Architects
The Open-Plan living extension seamlessly integrates itself into the Natural Environment.
Inspiration for a mid-sized contemporary one-storey black house exterior in Sydney with wood siding, a metal roof and a flat roof.
Morell House
Morell House
Vibe Design Group
Robert Hamer
Large contemporary two-storey multi-coloured house exterior in Melbourne with a flat roof.
Brighton development
Brighton development
KatDesign
Photo of a contemporary exterior in Melbourne.
Torrens Valley House
Torrens Valley House
Mountford Williamson Architecture
This contemporary pavilion extends an existing heritage stone cottage in the Adelaide Hills. The property has been used for many years by the owners as a weekender and for holiday stays. The extended family had outgrown the small cottage and required more space for living and entertaining. The addition provides new living, dining, master bedroom and outdoor spaces. Alterations and refurbishments have also been carried out to the old cottage which becomes bedrooms and secondary living space. The pavilion addition compliments and contrasts with the old cottage. It is designed in way that does not compete with or overwhelm the character of the old cottage. The roofline of the new pavilion is kept low and flat which helps emphasise the pitched roof and heavy chimneys of the cottage and creates a balance between the old and new. The openness of the new pavilion contrasts with the cellular nature of the existing cottage, which has been repurposed as bedrooms and secondary living spaces. The heavy stone walls and small windows make the old cottage the perfect place for this – solid, quiet, and peaceful. The old and new are separated with a small glazed corridor link – which becomes the new main entry to the house. Elements of the old cottage such as the verandah have been re-interpreted in the new addition – the rhythm of white verandah posts and shaded thresholds surrounding the old and new parts of the building help to bring a continuity and connection between them. The addition has been designed with a sense of openness and connection between the internal spaces, as well as to the outside. The large walls of glass doors open up views to the surrounding rural landscape, and give access to the verandah and landscape beyond. Outdoor space is defined through the use of off-form concrete retaining walls, along with changes in planting texture which seamlessly extend the inside to the outside. An operable roof over the courtyard allows protected outdoor living throughout the year, with a servery from the kitchen opening up to it with bifold windows. The design incorporates passive solar design techniques to ensure a comfortable, low energy use home all year round. The floorplan of the new pavilion is strategically angled, shifting its orientation to the north. This allows low angle winter sun deep into the home, heating up the concrete thermal mass floor. In summer, when the sun is higher in the sky, the glazing and thermal mass are shaded by the optimised verandah overhang depth. Doors and windows are double glazed and timber framed, minimising heat loss in winter.
Beach Style Exterior
Beach Style Exterior
Beach style one-storey stucco white house exterior in Perth with a hip roof and a metal roof.
Sydney St Residence
Sydney St Residence
Harbour City Homes
Inspiration for a traditional two-storey brick red house exterior in Sydney with a gable roof and a tile roof.
Roscommon House
Roscommon House
Neil Cownie Architect Pty Ltd
The two story house deliberately presents to the street looking like a single level house. The house is a sculptural play of solid and void with the horizontal concrete roof appearing to hover above the house. The house has been designed to maximize winter sun penetration while providing shade through summer with excellent cross ventilation providing cooling summer breezes through the house.
East Fremantle Residence
East Fremantle Residence
Unios
Astro Fixed One Wall Light
Lighting supplier: HS Reflections
Photo of a contemporary exterior in Perth.
Thornbury House
Thornbury House
C. Kairouz Architects
Two story townhouse with angles and a modern aesthetic with brick, render and metal cladding. Large black framed windows offer excellent indoor outdoor connection and a large courtyard terrace with pool face the yard.
Modern Coastal project
Modern Coastal project
Nimmo Nielsen Collective
Off The Richter Creative
Photo of a transitional two-storey grey house exterior in Sydney with mixed siding, a hip roof and a shingle roof.
Hill House
Hill House
Reece Keil Design
Modern two-storey white house exterior in Gold Coast - Tweed with mixed siding and a flat roof.
The front exterior of your home – the driveway, front yard, verandah and entrance – is a fantastic place to start making that all-important first impression on house guests. Even mailboxes and house numbers can have a wonderful way of grabbing people’s attention. The architectural design should reflect the overall style of your house and the family that live there; while your choice of materials will help your house blend in with its surrounds.

Browse the photos on Houzz for ideas and inspiration for the exterior of your house, and strike up a conversation with the architects and designers of your favourite picks. You’ll find house designs for contemporary, eclectic, modern, traditional styles and more.

How do I decide on the exterior style of my home?


Your location, overall sense of style, budget and current home layout will dictate the style of your exterior. If you’re renovating a period home, the materials and features you use should reflect the date in which it was built, while a unique colour scheme could add contemporary flair.

New homes may prefer to look to modern or contemporary designs with structural simplicity, whereas, if you live by the ocean, a beach-style design may better suit your locale. That’s not to say you can’t build a new home that has period influences. If you’re a traditionalist, you can borrow architectural details from the Art Deco period, for instance, or use finishes that reflect more of a Scandinavian style, too.

What exterior house colours and materials should I use?


Traditional homes typically use brick and timber building materials, while stone, board-formed concrete and metal cladding are popular contemporary options. Again, the materials you use will depend on your location and the statement you want to make. Your budget will also affect your choice. Vinyl siding is affordable and easy to install, while stone is more expensive but durable and low maintenance.

If you’re not ready to renovate but want to update the exterior of your home, you can still paint it. Look to your neighbours when choosing exterior house colours. Consider the streetscape and what type of colours are already in use, firstly, so you don’t replicate next door’s shade; and secondly, so you don’t stand out like a sore thumb. If you’re renovating a period home, you could paint features or intricate details in a bold, standout hue. Front doors, garage doors and window trims also look great in eye-catching colours, even if the rest of the house’s facade is neutral.

How can I maximise my home’s street appeal?


To spice up your home’s architectural design, landscape the surrounding area with plants and pathways that accent the style of your home. If you just need a quick revamp, look at your cement and pavers – these can split and crack over time; and repairing or replacing them can do wonders for your street appeal, especially if it’s a large area like your driveway. Plants, garden paths or low walls can can also add structure to your front yard.

Light up your home with sufficient outdoor lighting to make walking up to the front door easy at night. You could use bollard lights along your entry path, or replace tiny wall sconces with statement pendant lighting at the entrance or on your verandah. Decorative elements such as house numbers, mailboxes and doormats will also add character. And if you're looking to sell your house, it may be worth hiring a stylist to help make the most of your property.

Whether you want inspiration for planning an exterior renovation or are building a designer exterior from scratch, Houzz has 1,307,163 images from the best designers, decorators, and architects in the country, including C. Kairouz Architects and Reece Keil Design. Look through exterior photos in different colours and styles and when you find an exterior design that inspires you, save it to an Ideabook or contact the Pro who made it happen to see what kind of design ideas they have for your home. Explore the beautiful exterior ideas photo gallery and find out exactly why Houzz is the best experience for home renovation and design.