Strathfield Alts + AddsContemporary Exterior, Sydney

Steel structure, wrc clad framing, horizontal louvres; Patrick O'Carrigan

Inspiration for a contemporary exterior in Sydney. —  Houzz
Related Photo Topics
This photo has no questions

What Houzz contributors are saying:

theplumbette
The Plumbette added this to Your Spring Outdoor Maintenance Plumbing Guide6 September 2018

Check rainwater tanksRainwater tanks could have a whole story dedicated to their maintenance. However, the main checks are to ensure all openings have their mesh inserts to prevent debris, vermin and mosquitoes from going into your tank water.Check the overflow pipe is secured to your stormwater drainage, and ensure any downpipes connecting to your rainwater tank have fall and are fastened correctly so the water flows into the tank.The pump attached to your rainwater tank should have a cover. Check if the cover is still doing its job or if it needs to be replaced.

catherine_smith1953805
Spacesmiths added this to Saving for a (Non) Rainy Day11 May 2016

Tanks have to have a flat, well-supported base (1000 litres of water weighs one tonne). A reinforced concrete slab or well-levelled concrete pavers are best. If you want to put the tank on a stand, you’ll need engineering advice to ensure the structure can take the weight of the tank and water. Tanks and stands need to meet Building Research Association of New Zealand (BRANZ) standards.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

b_andb_k
B added this to Garden2 October 2018

Rainwater tank incorporated into the landscaping

bra000
bra000 added this to WATER13 April 2018

Must be Australia... POC+P architects 1 Review Strathfield Alts + Adds 68 Saves | 0 Questions Popular Stories Ground Force: Top 10 Ground Covers for Your Garden Australian Native Coastal Plants Bring the Beach Home NZ Homes Show Less Means More Contemporary Exterior by STUDIO e* STUDIO e* SaveEmail When you’re building new or extending the footprint of non-permeable surfaces on your property (that means swimming pools or concrete driveways, as well as buildings) most councils now require you to install a retention tank to catch rainwater. This means that after a rainstorm, water is gradually eased into the stormwater system as sudden, heavy water flow can flood old systems, causing stormwater and sewage to merge – not pretty.

sara_carley
Sara Carley added this to sara_carley's ideas11 June 2016

stylish water tank fits with slats above

neetslouise
neetslouise added this to West Geelong11 June 2016

Green Living Life Latest from NZ Saving for a (Non) Rainy Day Install a design-smart water tank now to start collecting winter's watery bounty for the summer Catherine Smith 8 June 2016 Houzz New Zealand Editorial Staff. A design addict from way back, I can't resist... More Email Comment4Like4Bookmark16PrintEmbed Click "Embed" to display an article on your own website or blog. Now that the winter rains have arrived, it’s hard to remember how dry the garden gets through summer and early autumn – and how hefty the water bills become. But this is the smart time to invest in a water tank so you can collect nature’s free supply that winter so generously brings – and start hoarding for when the rains dry up again. But forget the big round tanks on the stand beside the house that were a standard beach or rural sight in New Zealand for so long, because now that townies have gotten in on the water-collecting act, city style has arrived. Contemporary by Tanksalot Ltd Tanksalot Ltd SaveEmail Vicki Niethe and her husband Clint of Tanksalot have decades of experience helping homeowners select the right tank, eventually introducing the slimlines that are common in Australia. They are discreet enough to fit into restricted spaces, but Vicki’s advice is to go big – both the size of the tank and the amount of roof run-off you direct into it. At a minimum, she recommends a 5000-litre tank if you live in an area with year-round rain. For her family of four adults, she’s found that is plenty to supply two toilets, laundry, dishwasher and two outside taps. Some tanks are as slim as 600mm. Popular Stories Ground Force: Top 10 Ground Covers for Your Garden Australian Native Coastal Plants Bring the Beach Home NZ Homes Show Less Means More Contemporary Exterior by STUDIO e* STUDIO e* SaveEmail When you’re building new or extending the footprint of non-permeable surfaces on your property (that means swimming pools or concrete driveways, as well as buildings) most councils now require you to install a retention tank to catch rainwater. This means that after a rainstorm, water is gradually eased into the stormwater system as sudden, heavy water flow can flood old systems, causing stormwater and sewage to merge – not pretty. Tanks will also need an overflow pipe for when the tank is full. Incredibly, one square metre of roof area produces one litre of water for every millimetre of rain, so you’ll want to maximise the roof area feeding to your tank to collect every precious drop. It doesn’t take long to use up the water. Vicki points out that running a garden hose uses nearly 1000 litres an hour, so make sure your tank will suit your water-use requirements. Contemporary Garden by Andrew Lynch Landscaping Andrew Lynch Landscaping SaveEmail You will need a first-flush diverter that diverts the initial flow of dirty water from the roof (from dust, for example, or heavy metals from nearby roads) which drains the contaminants to a soakage area, before allowing the following clean water into the tank. A leaf strainer prevents debris from clogging up the tank (and decaying inside) and that will need be cleaned out frequently. Contemporary Exterior by POC+P architects POC+P architects SaveEmail Tanks have to have a flat, well-supported base (1000 litres of water weighs one tonne). A reinforced concrete slab or well-levelled concrete pavers are best. If you want to put the tank on a stand, you’ll need engineering advice to ensure the structure can take the weight of the tank and water. Tanks and stands need to meet Building Research Association of New Zealand (BRANZ) standards.