raineyann

Re-coat or replace kitchen cupboard doors

Lorraine Cobcroft
10 months ago

We are planning a revamp of the kitchen in the home we just purchased in Beerway (Sunshine Coast, Qld). Everything is in excellent order, but we don't like the layout and the fact that the cupboard doors are laminate. Also, we hate the door handles!


We have considered having the doors and drawer fronts two-pack coated and replacing the handles, but I'm wondering how the cost would compare with just having new doors made, as I'd prefer no handles at all. Most of the cabinetry is drawers - only one cupboard under the sink and some above the fridge and stove.


I wonder if anyone has any experience with having doors and drawer fronts recoated?

Comments (12)

  • Kate
    10 months ago

    If u hate the layout why not live with the other issues and save up for a full change. Investigate whether u could reuse some carcasses. Maybe post your layout for ideas

  • Lorraine Cobcroft
    Original Author
    10 months ago

    Many thanks for that helpful advice, Dreamer. Good to know you got a good result, and even as far back as 2008, $450 sounds like a good price for recoating doors in 2 pack. I will definitely seek some quotes before pulling everything out and starting over. You are right. It's more responsible to reuse what is there, and what is there is good quality. It's just the layout and finish that needs to be addressed.


    Thanks to you also, Kate. I will post the layout - existing and new.

    The area behind the existing pantry (where the BBQ is marked on the plan for the new kitchen) was a carport but is now a gorgeous outdoor dining area surrounded by gardens and having a feature timber ceiling. The S/G door beside the pantry is currently the 'front' door to the house. We planned to semi-enclose the 'carport', flyscreen all around, and recoat the expoxy floor to make it our main dining area, as the climate allows for outdoor dining most of the time. On the other side of the kitchen there is a beautiful veranda with lovely views. We don't like that the kitchen is cut off from both outdoor areas and sort of 'boxed in'. We want to open it up to the outdoors, including installing a servery window.


    There is a store room behind the existing pantry that can become a butler's pantry. By incorporating a dining table in the island bench, near the door to the verandah, we can dine inside while enjoying the views and winter sunshine, and breezes from the north east; service dining on the veranda if we choose; and enjoy the lovely sheltered dining area on the south side as well (which is the best place to eat in hot weather). We plan to put a new front door on the far end of the 'carport'.


    The plan involves demolishing the existing pantry, which is a bit sad - but it closes the space up and makes the kitchen quite small, and combined with the U-shape kitchen, results in a boxed in feeling. The shelving can be reused in the new pantry and in a store room we will create at one end of the garage.


    Thoughts and suggestions welcome.



  • siriuskey
    10 months ago

    a full floor plan will be better to explain what is and what's possible

  • Lorraine Cobcroft
    Original Author
    10 months ago

    Here you go, siriuskey. This plan is not quite accurate. It seems changes were made in the initial build - mainly removing the raked ceiling (disappointing! I would have liked it!) and changing the 09.18 window in the garage to a sliding door located closer to the store room and laundry (thankfully, as there's no direct exit from the laundry). Some sliding doors have also been changed to hinged doors (the one from laundry to garage, from master bedroom to ensuite, and into Bed 2.

    What is marked 'patio' is actually a gorgeous covered veranda with feature timber ceiling and lovely planter boxes all along the edge instead of a railing. The carport has been transformed to a beautiful outdoor living area with a spa just behind it and a feature timber ceiling, though the floor is still exposed aggregate which will have to be sealed over so it's smooth for mopping.


    Overall, we love the house, except for the kitchen and the laundry and bathroom décor. I'm also disappointed there is no bath tub and hoping we can install one in the main bathroom and I'd like a small wash basin in the main WC, but drainage is an issue in houses built on concrete slabs when you want to rearrange things. I wanted to put a sink in the store room also, when converting to a butler's pantry, but again drainage is a question.


    Have no idea yet how to improve the bathroom décor. Currently there are very plain mocha coloured tiles floor to ceiling. The vanities will have doors two-pac coated, be topped with stone and have new basins and taps fitted. The walls have me perplexed. I'd like to add some features, and I hate tiles in showers.


    We plan to put a wall-mounted clothes line outside the store room and enclose with slatted aluminium screening (as that is the front entrance - but I don't like the thought of having to walk the full length of the house and further to get to the clothes line!)


    As we have only one car, we plan to divide the garage, partition in front of half the door and convert half the garage to a music room for my hubby. I hoped to put sliding shoji screens or similar across in front of the laundry cabinets so it looks more like a passageway into his music room.


    The biggest issue is the kitchen, and it will be costly, but I'm prepared for that. The rest of the work will be done in stages as budget permits.


    I see such great ideas in comments on Houzz, so I'm eager to see what suggestions others have for creating my dream home!



  • Lorraine Cobcroft
    Original Author
    10 months ago

    Should have noted that it's a rural lot with long driveway from the street, so the appearance of the front isn't quite as critical as when a house is street-facing.

  • PRO
    THE JOINERY STORE
    10 months ago

    It is often not as economical as people first think. When resurfacing products or refacing cabinets, there is often more labour involved than when replacing them and labour is expensive.


    I would highly recommend at least getting a comparative quote for both options.

  • Kate
    10 months ago

    Hi. Firstly basin in toilet, if plumbing too hard try a toilet with integrated basin in the cistern, save plumbing and water costs.
    Kitchen, without living there it is hard to give advice, but did you consider closing access to master and using the laundry hall to access master, through broom closet, or is that too Narnia! That option would allow better connection to patio, not to carport.

    Lorraine Cobcroft thanked Kate
  • Lorraine Cobcroft
    Original Author
    10 months ago

    Interesting idea, Kate. I might give it some thought. The passageway from the master bedroom doors could then be closed off and made into a small pantry. or both the kitchen bench and the WIR extended.

  • dreamer
    10 months ago

    Regarding no tiles in shower. There are a great range of acrylic wall panels available. These can be purchased at Bunnings or other companies. http://www.bellessi.com.au/bathroom-shower-panels.php

    Lorraine Cobcroft thanked dreamer
  • Lorraine Cobcroft
    Original Author
    10 months ago

    Wow! Some interesting designs there. I had looked briefly at Mr Wet Wall. My mother used Bellini as a kitchen splashback - but just a plain colour. I hadn't realised they offered so many different designs. I wonder how they go just put over the top of tiles?

  • Kate
    10 months ago

    I had two bathroom guys, including one who sold acrylic panels warm me off them as can be hard to cut tap holes and to seal corners had Ugly sealing strips. My sister has glass walls in her shower, which she boringly has painted in wall colour, but not over tiles. If you put over tiles the tiles have to be bonded well to wall still, to hold the weight, ok if not too old.
    Has anyone else used them?

    Lorraine Cobcroft thanked Kate