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ladyrob1

Has anyone ever encountered th building inspector who doesn't do subfloors and doesn' do ceiling spaces or attics...etc...very precious types. I'd expect a bilding inspector to come dressed appropriately for crawling into such spaces rather than a dapper chappie in the latest style suit with his little clipboard and parker pen looking very official, Beware of the nepotism click too! In smaller rural communities building inspectors and members of council in the building department and some draftsman and bildrs are all in together...pays to know about such things. For me,,,I went to the local Coulcil building deparment and asked if I could have some information on Council requirements for new buildings and then asked were these the same requirements say in 1980 0r 2000 etc and what had changed...of course emphasis on the iportance of the job thy were doing seeing that citizens lived in safe homes that were built to standard...we are fortunate to have such regulations today..la la la la...You'd be surprised how forthcoming some of the fat pussycats are,,,( not insinuating that all in these professions are bent)...just that there are those who are "on the take"...(bit like some lawyers...they'll argue your case vehemently in court and have dinner and champagne together on you the same night). Its a question of asking around too. People will tell you of their experiences if you ask politely. I've found, though, that the best practise of all is to go to the building regulations and try to understand them yourselves...not difficult for someone with an average command of the language...providing that whoever wrote it all out coud also express themselves clearly...Becoming more and more difficult today to find people who know the difference between - say- "bought' and 'brought' and know how to use the words.

Anyway, Houzzers selling or buying, its been my experience as a single woman who bought an old house not knowing a thing about building regulations and inspections and inappropriate materials etc, etc..that if you find your way yourself, go the the "bosses" of the inspectors, learn what the inspectors should be looking for and then, when you come across a good man who knows his job and does it without being too pedantic...you've got a good start.

This Article and all the info above has been really helpful to me. THANKS Cameron Frazer ! Thanks Houzz!



   
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Andrew Bounader

Good Evening Ladyrob1,

It's unfortunate that your experience with inspectors has been a challenge to say the least. We have an Australian Standard (AS 4349.1 AS4349.2 and AS4349.3) that explains in detail exactly what the 'Minimum' an inspector is to do to comply with that standard and if they don't then their insurance company - if they have any, won't be happy to pay out if they're found at fault for missing out on inspecting the subfloor or roof space. It explains the minimum size of the access hole for both and the clearance for the subfloor and roof space. So ask an inspector if they use the Standard (I'm assuming you're from Australia - if you're not there is an ASTM and a BS as well). If not then I'd seriously be looking for another inspector. To do a 'proper' inspection to the Standard for Structure and for Timber Pest will take an experienced inspector doing the right thing for a home built in the 1960's to 1980's about an hour up to an hour and a half - for the grounds, outside, subfloor, building interior - All rooms and special attention to wet areas and kitchens, floors and flooring, ceilings and then the roof space and finally the roof exterior.

Things to look for are :- non-professionally built external structures and additions to the building. Poor drainage and the way surface water runs away from the building, downpipes / spouts and if they're damaged or plumbed in, eaves and gutters - condition and signs of water overflowing, Wood rot, trees in contact with structure that can block drains, and crack foundations, cracks in foundations and brickwork, condition of windows and doors, then you move inside..... so you can see why it should take more than a few minutes just having a 'bit of a look around' and why they can charge up to $800. It can take 30+ years to amass the knowledge and experience to work-out what it is you're looking at and that $800 can save you many, many times that in buying the wrong property.

Just my thoughts.

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ladyrob1

Thankyou Andrew!

   

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